Timber: Four Woolmers Estate trees to be given the chop

THE CHOP: The trees have not been deemed to have any heritage value, according to Woolmers. Picture: Phillip Biggs
THE CHOP: The trees have not been deemed to have any heritage value, according to Woolmers. Picture: Phillip Biggs

Woolmers Estate has sought council permission to remove gum trees as tall as nine metres from the boundary of its property. 

The UNESCO World Heritage-listed site submitted an application with the Northern Midlands Council to chop down four re-growth trees to provide a better view of the property’s new gates and enhance visibility for people exiting the property. 

Woolmers general manager Chris Duggan said the trees were not heritage-listed and had grown partially on council land. 

“It’s really a safety concern at the moment,” Mr Duggan said. 

“It’s a safety concern, because it blocks the view driving toward the new gate, but it also makes it difficult to see for when people are coming out.

“We need to make sure for people who are exiting [the property] that their view is not blocked by the trees.”

Woolmers’ heritage adviser Gayle Plunkett created a report on the potential removal of the trees, finding  there would be “very low impact” on the heritage values of the site.  

She estimated the trees had been growing since about 1990 and were not ecologically or historically significant. 

Following her findings, the Tasmanian Heritage Council signed off on the works, agreeing with Ms Plunkett’s findings that the trees would not damage the property’s heritage values. 

Mr Duggan said he had not heard of any opposition to the development application.  

“Specialists have been engaged to make sure everything is being organised correctly for environmental purposes,” he said. 

Arborist Adam Djatschenko was contracted to inspect the trees and the area for the potential environmental impact. 

“Given that there are existing gum trees in the immediate area, I don’t believe the removal of these trees would make a measurable difference to the scenery or the wildlife,” he said.

Public comment is open on the development application until April 4, with all comments to be addressed to council general manager Des Jennings. 

Detailed plans for the application are available at northernmidlands.tas.gov.au.