GM ban guards state's image

By Caitlin Jarvis
Updated January 14 2016 - 10:43pm, first published 8:33am
Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture director TIA director Holger Meinke.School of Land and FoodUniversity of TasmaniaThurs 11th Dec 2014photograph by Peter Mathew
BERURIM, ISRAEL - FEBRUARY 13: About 1,000 tiny seeds of hybrid cherry tomatoes, named Summer Sun and valued at about 1 USD each, are seen in a petrie dish as a Hazera Genetics laboratory worker sorts them at company headquarters February 13, 2007 at Berurim in central Israel. One kilogram of Summer Sun seeds developed by Hazera Genetics, an Israeli company specializing in breeding and marketing non-GMO hybrid varieties of vegetable and field crops, was sold to growers in Europe for 350,000 USD or about 268,800 Euros, more than sixteen times the price of gold. The warm-yellow colored fruit, with high concentrations of sugar which makes for a unique honey sweet taste, retails in Europe for about 23.50 USD, or about 18 Euros a kilogram. The seeds have been tinted blue, the company's trademark color. (Photo by David Silverman/Getty Images)

A MORATORIUM blanket ban on genetically modified crops in the state has nothing to do with the science, or the impacts on human health, according to the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA).

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