Break O’Day Council plans for the future

STRATEGIC PLAN: Protecting the environment will play a big role in the future of the council, according to the 10-year plan.
STRATEGIC PLAN: Protecting the environment will play a big role in the future of the council, according to the 10-year plan.

The Break O’Day Council has highlighted the need to improve its environmental policies in its 10-year strategic plan.

The 20-page document outlines three major areas the council will focus on over the next 10 years to achieve its vision – the environment, the economy and the community.

Accompanying the plan is a 2017-18 annual report, which outlines how the council intends to put its strategic plan into action for the next year.

The 10-year strategy says the council wants to “balance [its] use of the natural environment to ensure that it is available for future generations to enjoy”.

One of the key pillars of this strategy involves helping land owners and managers undertake land protection activities and programs. 

Land owners will be assisted by NRM North during these programs.

Initiatives such as a weed action plan, a cat tracker program and a dog management program were also touted by the council.

The council also intends to improve communication between the community and the council. 

The annual plan states that the council will improve its website, publish more online surveys and promote the council’s Facebook page in order to improve community communication over the next year.

The council’s plan states that its overarching vision for the next 10 years can be reached through further aligning the council’s goals with the community’s values.

“The plan has drawn on the views and thoughts of the community through a series of conversations which were facilitated by Frameworks for Change,” the plan read.

Acting general manager Bob Hoogland said the council and community members discussed a wide variety of topics during the community consultation phases. 

“It really touched on nearly aspect of municipal life,” Mr Hoogland said.

“Communication came up quite a bit. People wanted to make sure there are pathways for the community talks to us and for us to talk to the community. 

“The environment was another important issue for many people.

“People want to make sure that it is maintained for future generations.”