The Examiner's winter photography tips for 2017 Tasmania in Focus entrants

Tasmania in Focus is a competition that calls on the community to enter photos showcasing our glorious, rugged state. 

Photos are not confined to landscape shots; we also want to see the people who live, work and visit the Apple Isle. 

The year-long competition is broken into quarters: winter, spring, summer and autumn. 

You don’t need fancy equipment to enter but a good eye and great timing will be handy. 

Winter entries open on June 1, 2017 and close on August 6, 2017. All photos entered must be taken in Tasmania by someone aged 18 or over whose main source of income isn’t derived from photography.

Two of The Examiner’s senior photographers have shared some advice on capturing photos during the gloomy, wet months of the year. 

Words of wisdom from Phillip Biggs 

By underexposing one or two stops, you're able to create a contrast between the ray of light and darker areas. Picture: Phillip Biggs

By underexposing one or two stops, you're able to create a contrast between the ray of light and darker areas. Picture: Phillip Biggs

Low light: During winter the sun rises late, sets early and stays low during the day.

Look out for scenes where you might have heavy cloud and a ray of sunlight in the middle to create a dramatic contrast.

The camera will often see dark colours and make the picture brighter, but if you underexpose by one or two stops, using the +/- button on a DSLR, then it will give the correct reading for the sunny area, and make the dark areas look more dramatic.

Capturing frosty conditions can be challenging, but Phillip Biggs recommends overexposing to ensure you seize the detail offered by your subject. This photo was taken at Ben Lomond.

Capturing frosty conditions can be challenging, but Phillip Biggs recommends overexposing to ensure you seize the detail offered by your subject. This photo was taken at Ben Lomond.

Foggy/snowy weather conditions: The camera will look at the scene and read it as really bright, therefore making everything darker and losing detail. This is when you would overexpose by one stop, using the +/- button on a DSLR, to enhance the detail offered by your subject.

Jeni James and Zarco of Trevallyn on their morning walk through the mist and rain at Trevallyn Reserve. Picture: Phillip Biggs

Jeni James and Zarco of Trevallyn on their morning walk through the mist and rain at Trevallyn Reserve. Picture: Phillip Biggs

Batteries in the cold: Beware of your batteries in the cold; less current is produced in the cold so your battery life will deplete much quicker than in warmer conditions. Try keeping your batteries in your pocket to keep them warm and preserve their power.

Scott Gelston

Scott Gelston snapped a storm approaching Binnalong Bay from the balcony of his accommodation with a 200mm telephoto lens. Thoughts: One key to any good landscape image is to ensure that your horizon is completely level, and not to rush your image - in our four days at the beach house the view never looked close to what we saw on this morning.

Scott Gelston snapped a storm approaching Binnalong Bay from the balcony of his accommodation with a 200mm telephoto lens. Thoughts: One key to any good landscape image is to ensure that your horizon is completely level, and not to rush your image - in our four days at the beach house the view never looked close to what we saw on this morning.

Embrace the weather and go outside: Frosty mornings, rough seascapes, snow-capped mountains, puddles, dew-laced spiderswebs... There's so many elements at play during winter, making it arguably the best season to head out for dramatic landscape photos. Remember to look at both the landscape and the individual elements of a scene - you never know what you may find.

Stay indoors and keep warm: There's something to be said about the beautiful setting of a wood fire, the steam rising from a hearty soup on the stove or raindrops on the windowpane. If the outdoors isn't your thing, try looking at your home in a new light.

Be prepared: A plastic bag and some gaffer tape or rubber bands can help make a quick rain cover for your camera if you're worried about rain and the elements. Alternatively an underwater housing or specialty rain cover may be a good investment if you're considering heading outside for extender periods of photography.