Clarendon hosts Tasmanian Heritage Festival event

HERITAGE DAY: Guests travelled back in time at the historic Clarendon House on Sunday for the Voices of Animals event. Pictures: Neil Richardson

HERITAGE DAY: Guests travelled back in time at the historic Clarendon House on Sunday for the Voices of Animals event. Pictures: Neil Richardson

Tasmania’s historic Clarendon House came alive on Sunday as visitors enjoyed the inaugural Voices of Animals event.

Sunshine, animals and entertainment saw guests flocking through the gates to tour the historic property, which includes the main house, the stone barn, shearing shed and convict quarters and the popular gardens.

More than 30 stallholders set up for the day and visitors were treated to performances by the Tasmanian Light Horse troop, nurses dressed in World War I costumes with trained German Shepard rescue dogs, alpacas, dog agility trials, cattle, sheep and a reptile show.

While Sunday’s event was the first of its kind to be held at Clarendon, coordinator Jenny Staal said she hoped it would become an annual event at the homestead.

ON HORSEBACK: Nev Thomas, Jed Smith and Geoff Downes from the Tasmanian Lighthorse Regiment Historical Troop.

ON HORSEBACK: Nev Thomas, Jed Smith and Geoff Downes from the Tasmanian Lighthorse Regiment Historical Troop.

“It’s just about bringing people together and bringing the heritage alive,” she said.

“The whole place is just awe-inspiring, it’s magnificent, there’s nothing like it. Our main thing is making it so that people are aware it is here.” 

More than 20 volunteers work at the site and were on deck on at the weekend to get the event up and running.

One of those volunteers was Tony Dennett, who is currently growing a Dahlia garden on the property. 

While the flowers were not in bloom on Sunday, Mr Dennett said he was hoping the garden would become another reason for people to visit the site.

“I think people love to come [to Clarendon] for the tranquility,” Mr Dennett said.

“It’s not just the history … it’s a beautiful place, I just love it.”

The Voices of Animals at Clarendon was held as part of the Tasmanian Heritage Festival, which is celebrating its 30th year.

This year’s festival theme is ‘Having a Voice’ and aims to feature some of the people and animals behind the heritage properties.

Clarendon, Woolmers, the Tasmanian Wool Centre and other properties across the North are hosting events as part of the program. 

  • Clarendon House was built in 1838 and has been referred to by the National Trust as “Australia’s grandest rural colonial estate”.
  • The estate is open on Thursday, Saturday and Sunday from 10am until 4pm. The house is located at 234 Clarendon Station Road, Nile.
  • For more information on opening times and about the history of the property, search for Clarendon house on Facebook or visit www.nationaltrust.org.au/places/clarendon.
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