Major defence projects to be worked on in Tasmania

Australian Maritime College project lead investigator Jonathan Binns with an autonomous underwater vehicle. Picture: PAUL SCAMBLER

Australian Maritime College project lead investigator Jonathan Binns with an autonomous underwater vehicle. Picture: PAUL SCAMBLER

RESEARCHERS in Tasmania will be involved in the $3.8 billion naval building program, which includes the replacement of the nation's submarine fleet.

The ARC Training Centre for Transforming Australia's Naval Manufacturing Industry was officially opened yesterday at the Australian Maritime College.

Three major defence projects are to be worked upon, including the future submarine venture, which will cost the Australian government $30 billion over the next 20 years; the SEA500, which is for a frigate contract; and the SEA1180, which includes patrol boats.

University of Tasmania, alongside two partner universities, will be searching for 10 research students and three post-doctoral fellows for a three-year program.

AMC project lead investigator Dr Jonathan Binns said the program aimed to enhance naval design, boat manufacturing and monitoring of ship systems.

"They will be researching and developing methodology to enhance technology and innovation in naval design, manufacturing and sustainment, which is running boats, for example monitoring how the ship systems are going," Dr Binns said.

University of Tasmania vice-chancellor Professor Peter Rathjen said the project would feed into the Australian naval manufacturing industry by creating a new cohort of engineers and researchers.

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