Partners, family reveal sadness, anger, relief

Adam Thorn, the son of murdered Lake Leake man John Lewis Thorn

Adam Thorn, the son of murdered Lake Leake man John Lewis Thorn

THE partners and families of two Tasmanian men killed 14 years apart have described their overwhelming relief after Stephen Roy Standage was found guilty of the murders and sentenced to 48 years behind bars.

Slain fisherman Ronald Jarvis's partner Debi Marshall stared Standage in the eyes as she addressed him in court.

"I bid you farewell to your permanent home at Risdon Prison," Ms Marshall said.

"I hope you never again see the sky as a free man."

Later, Ms Marshall said her partner was not perfect, but that by far his biggest mistake was knowing and trusting Standage.

She described the convicted killer as a Judas and waster.

Deborah Marshall (short blonde hair) leaving the Hobart Supreme Court yesterday.Pic: Daniel McCulloch

Deborah Marshall (short blonde hair) leaving the Hobart Supreme Court yesterday.Pic: Daniel McCulloch

"It has been a long road to get to this day," she said.

"Stephen Standage is where he should have been a very, very long time ago."

Geoffrey Jarvis said he never believed his brother's 1992 killing would be solved.

"I've had my mother and three siblings die since this happened," Mr Jarvis said.

"I'm just glad, hopefully, that it's over . . . and I just hope he (Standage) rots in hell."

Adam Thorn was left sad and angry after father John Thorn's "callous and cowardly" murder in 2006.

He described feeling empty after yesterday's verdict was delivered.

"I don't feel anything to be honest," Mr Thorn said.

"I probably should feel excited, but like I said, it just doesn't bring dad back.

"Whether it helps in some way, shape or form, maybe in the next 12 months I'll be able to tell."

Mr Thorn said he would have the image of his father's lifeless body lying in remote Lake Leake bushland etched inside his head for the rest of his life.

But he said it was satisfying to have the haunting image sitting next to one of Standage in the dock after being found guilty.

Adam Thorn's sister, Tania Lamb, spoke of anguish and anxiety over unresolved tensions between herself and her father.

"It's a good feeling that someone has been made to pay for what happened," Ms Lamb said.

"But it doesn't bring dad back and it doesn't give me the chance to tell him that I'm sorry our relationship was bad."

Ms Lamb said her father was the last thing she thought about before going to sleep each night, and the first thing she thought of every morning.

In a statement read out in court, Mr Thorn's partner Susan Fletcher described the turmoil of having her "gentle, loving soul mate" snatched away.

Ms Fletcher said he was brutally taken in the prime of his life by a best mate he thought he could trust.

"Justice has finally been served," Ms Fletcher's submission read.

"May my loving John now rest in peace."

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