The B&E Launceston Ten training program - week two

Kate Pedley's Launceston Ten training program - week two

The first step is the longest stride.

Commit to the right training program for you and you will be lining up at the start line on Sunday 15 June with confidence that you will not only finish this 10 km event, but you will love the experience.

This is a unique race with unique conditions. It is set in the coldest state of Australia in winter, so you need to learn to train in the dark and perform in the cold.

We have put together a 9 week training program that will help you achieve all of this.

Launceston athlete, Kate Pedley, knows all about training in our unique conditions. 

Kate has a long history of competition at all distances, from representing Australia 

in the 400m event a the World Junior Championships in Jamaica to running the Launceston Ten last year in under 35 minutes. Kate has partnered with us to bring you a nine-week training program, customized to Launceston conditions. Whether you just want to get to the finish line or run sub 45 minutes, these three programs will help you achieve your Launceston Ten goal.

Every week, we will include local tips and information, to keep you training through winter. We will also profile a local runner every week, to keep you motivated.

Week Two Top 10 Tips

1. Make a date.

Commit to the event and find a training partner. Having a goal will help you to complete the training program and make it to the finish line on June 15.

2. It not as cold as you think!

The problem with winter running is that you have to make certain sacrifices. Are you willing to be frozen and miserable at first so that the majority of the run will be comfortable, or would you rather take a nice jacket at the beginning and roast? 

Wear warm clothes, but not too warm. The unfortunate truth is that you’ll be most comfortable if you start a little cold. Yes, going outside in a light jacket when the temperature is freezing seems crazy, but within minutes you’ll be warm and comfortable. Taking too much clothing at the beginning will leave you sweaty and uncomfortable, so sacrifice comfort at the beginning for performance later.

3. Warm up and Stretch Indoors

Two tricks to help you resist the temptation to wear too much: 

• warm your clothing (especially your base layer) on a heated towel rail before you put it on

• do some warm-up exercises in the house before you set off in order to help prevent muscle strains, you must warm up properly with two or three minutes of moderate exercise indoors, such as walking on a treadmill, jumping rope  or doing a few sets of stairs, then do your stretching routine. In winter, warming up  and stretching inside may be a better choice because you’re more likely to stretch  thoroughly in a warm, comfortable environment than out in the cold.

4. Layer for Success. 

Layering allows the warm air from your body to act as an insulator. Against your skin, lightweight synthetic clothing, which wicks moisture away from the skin, is ideal. 

However, wool is popular again, in the form of mid-and lightweight base layers. Wool is naturally odour resistant, so it doesn’t need the anti-microbial treatment and it provides superior warmth. Other non-synthetic materials trap moisture—if you sweat, your clothes will get wet, causing discomfort and chafing.

Your middle later should insulate while still allowing moisture to escape.

Zoning techniques are popular, which basically means thicker insulations like fleece with different fabrics in specific places in the jacket, such as the core, under the arms and  down the sleeves.

When running outside for long periods of time you may need a third layer, such as a lightweight, windproof, water-resistant (or waterproof), yet breathable jacket. 

How to Layer:

• Neck warmer, fleecy headband, or beanie

• Mittens or gloves

• Fleece pullover over a thin long-sleeve top

• Light jacket with reflective material

• Compression tights under shorts or loose pants

.

5. Wear a Hat. 

Conventional wisdom says that we lose up to 80% of our body heat through our head, which is why you should know that conventional wisdom is oftentimes completely false. You don’t lose any more heat through your head than through anywhere else on your body, but you’re usually (hopefully?) wearing clothes in most other places. Wearing a hat keeps your ears and head warm and saves energy by preventing body heat from radiating off into the atmosphere. 

6. Protect Your Skin and Eyes

You would always wear sunscreen in summer and with our high UV index rating the same rule applies in winter. When running in wind or rain, it is a good idea to protect your eyes with glasses. Also apply a thin film of Vaseline on your face and lips to prevent chapping from wind and cold.

7. Arm Your Feet

To keep warmth in and water out, your winter running shoes should have the least amount of mesh. Using wicking or waterproof socks.

8. Don't Run on Ice. 

On our frosty mornings, beware of black ice on the footpaths and roads. Your shoes will instantly turn into skates.

9. Change Quickly Post-run

Your core body temperature drops fast as soon as you stop running. To avoid chills, or even hypothermia, change your wet clothes - head to toe - as soon as you can. 

Put a dry hat on wet hair. And drink something hot – what a great reason to go to a coffee shop after a run, use their bathroom to change, then relax with a hot chocolate.

10. Know When It’s Better to Stay Inside

There is a chance you will be running (or walking) 10km in rain or wind on Sunday 15 June, so running in all weather will build your character to cope with any conditions. 

However, do be prepared to work-out indoors on days when the rain is horizontal, the wind makes the run too unpleasant, or a big frost means your favourite running track is just too icy. You can’t compete with the experience of running outdoors, but a bad run will only sap your confidence and be meaningless, so adapt or postpone the session, or hit the treadmill. 

DISCLAIMER: Undertaking any of these programs is at your own risk. Should you have any health care related questions, please call or see your physician or other qualified health care provider promptly. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.

Week Two – Program One. Get me to the finish line!

Notes: This is a walk run program, designed to see you finish the Launceston Ten injury free. Technology has conditioned us to expect results now. Your body doesn't work that way. Don't try to do more, even if you feel you can. If, on the other hand, you find the program too strenuous, just stretch it out. Don't feel pressured to continue faster than you're able. Repeat weeks if needed and move ahead only when you feel you're ready. Always run easy at a pace comfortable enough for you to chat to your running partner.

Monday: 5 min walk. Stretch (see training tips below). 10 mins of 1 minute run and 1 minute walk. Finish with 5 minutes walking cool down. Stretch.

Tuesday: Cross Training 45 - 60 mins (see cross training notes below). 

Wednesday: 5 min walk. Stretch (see training tips below). 10 mins of 1 minute run and 1 minute walk. Finish with 5 minutes walking cool down. Stretch.

Thursday: Rest Day (training notes below). 

Friday: Cross Training 45 - 60 

Saturday: 5 min walk. Stretch (see training tips below). 10 mins of 1 minute run and 1 minute walk. Finish with 5 minutes walking cool down. Stretch.

Sunday: Rest Day (Grab a relaxing massage or a soak in a tub with bath salts)

Week Two – Program 2. Break The Hour!

Notes: To break the hour you will need to be running 6 minute kilometres by the end of the nine weeks. Be sure to achieve this pace slowly in order to finish the Launceston Ten injury free. Technology has conditioned us to expect results now. 

Your body doesn't work that way. Don't try to do more, even if you feel you can. If, on the other hand, you find the program too strenuous, just stretch it out. Don't feel pressured to continue faster than you're able. Repeat weeks if needed and move ahead only when you feel you're ready. Always run easy at a pace comfortable enough for you to chat to your running partner. Effort sessions come later!

Monday: 10 min walk/ jog warm up. Stretch (see training tips below). 30 - 45 min run at a consistent comfortable pace. Finish with 5 mins walking cool down. Stretch.

Tuesday: Cross Training 45 - 60 mins. (see training tips below)

Wednesday: 10 min walk/ jog warm up. Stretch (see training tips below). 30 - 45 min run at a consistent comfortable pace. Finish with 5 mins walking cool down. Stretch.

Thursday: Cross training 45 - 60 mins 

Friday: Rest day (see training tips below)

Saturday: 10 min walk/ jog warm up. Stretch (see training tips below). 30 - 45 min run at a consistent comfortable pace. Finish with 5 mins walking cool down. Stretch.

Sunday: Rest Day (Grab a relaxing massage or a soak in a tub with bath salts)

Week Two – Program Three. Go for it! (break 45 mins)

Notes: This program is only suitable for experienced runners who already have a sound level of running fitness. To begin, you will need to be able to run sub 4minute kms. Weights are an excellent cross training choice. Recovery means stop and walk to allow your heart and muscles to recover before the next effort.

Monday: 20 min warm up. 8 x 1min effort 75% with 1 min recovery. Cool down and stretch

Tuesday: 5 minute warm up. Stretch. 5km run at just out of comfort level. Strength training. Cool down and stretch

Wednesday: 15 min warm up, hill session (8x45 secs) 15 min cool down and stretch

Thursday: Cross Training 15 min warm up, hill session (8x45 secs) 15 min cool down and stretch

Friday: Rest day

Saturday: 20 min warm up, 30 min tempo run, cool down and stretch

Sunday: 11 km run at easy pace

Program training tips. Not matter which program you are following, always apply these training rules:

• Always warm up and cool down

As our days become cooler, it is vital to warm up and cool down. Warming up is an excellent way to send your body a clear message that you’re about to become physically active. This way, your heart and legs could adjust properly. To warn up, start with a brisk walk followed by easy running for couple of minutes or so. Then enjoy a few gentle stretches (never stretch cold muscles) and begin your program. When you finish your running, take a few of minutes to cool down by running very slowly and walking in the last minutes of your workout. Finish with a stretch. Maintaining warm-ups and cool downs greatly helps in reducing muscle pains which, in turn, improves your overall recovery process.

• Always stretch

Many runners keep seeing the same running injuries popping up, and they are usually avoidable. Excess tightness in certain running muscles, the glutes especially, leads to the body to move in inefficient patterns, and injuries can often happen as a result of this compensation. Find one stretch each that you love for your hamstrings, quads, claves, glutes and back. Never stretch or hold to the point of pain. Stretches should make your muscles are loose and your body able to function the way it was meant to when you run.

• Cross train

Cross training refers to other wonderful exercises that become an important part of your program. This includes swimming, bike-riding, hiking, Pilates, Yoga, walking the dog. The beauty of cross training is that it helps increasing your fitness level while giving your running-muscles a break.

• Hydrate. Hydrate. Hydrate

An easy trap to fall into in cool conditions is to forget to hydrate. Even in cold weather we use water to sweat, lubricate joints, tendons, and ligaments, and to carry blood efficiently to major organs. Dehydration causes your blood volume to drop, which lowers your body's ability to transfer heat and forces your heart to beat faster, making it difficult for your body to meet aerobic demands. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink. Drink early and often - every day.

• Take your rest days seriously

If you don't take time for proper R&R, your body won't adapt to the stress of your training—you won't get stronger or faster. Neglect recovery, and you will start to lose strength and speed. It is so easy to get carried away with the wonderful feeling of your new fitness – but if you don’t rest you will sink into the awful black hole known as overtraining.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop