Mill strategy is high on agenda

THE Greens and Liberals will each hold party room meetings to plot their parliamentary strategy in a high stakes tactical game just two months out from the state election.

Both parties were tight-lipped yesterday on how they would handle a sudden return to Parliament. 

Labor is set to recall Parliament in a bid to fast-track the controversial Tamar Valley pulp mill.

Premier Lara Giddings is expected to reveal more details about the bold plan today when she will also sack the Greens ministers and name the election date, in a three-pronged announcement to cement the split between the power-sharing partners.

The Greens will oppose the proposed ``doubt removal'' legislation designed to quash a legal threat to the mill, while the Liberals will back it.

State Opposition Leader Will Hodgman called for Parliament to sit next Thursday - the earliest possible date - to enable an election to be held as soon as possible.

``It is clear that the Premier has decided to recall the Parliament in order to use the pulp mill permits to formalise her fake divorce with the Greens,'' Mr Hodgman said.

However, neither party would say whether they would move a no-confidence motion, which could bring down the government and force an early election.

Greens leader Nick McKim said the Greens would not support a Liberal bid.

``If we think that's an issue, then, as we always have, we'll do something ourselves, but that's not to suggest that we might do that,'' Mr McKim said.

Mr McKim repeatedly declined to answer other questions.

``If you want politics and want to ask political questions, go to the Labor and Liberal parties because that's all they've got,'' he said. 

``They are just simply politicking on a pulp mill that they know is a myth.''

Gunns receiver KordaMentha this week revealed there were six potential buyers for the failed timber company's assets, but not all were interested in the pulp mill.

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