Too much T20 can be bad for you

Ben Hilfenhaus being ordered to stand down from Hobart Hurricanes duties on Sunday might be the best thing for his international future.

Not from a physical perspective, but a cricket one.

The last thing he needs is more of the bite-sized version of the game.

This form of cricket has been extremely detrimental to his cause of late.

Hilfenhaus's bowling action is more round-arm than last summer, which is a by-product of the defensive bowling that T20 calls for.

Subsequently, the 29-year-old is no longer the effective weapon that destroyed India last summer.

In the lead-up to the South African series, he was on Champions League duty, which came after being part of the national T20 world cup squad.

In hindsight, it would have been better for him to have had a red ball in his hand rather than a white one.

Hilfenhaus's ineffectiveness is a problem that desperately needs to be rectified in time for next year's Ashes series.

If he continues to struggle (he took just six wickets in his two Tests against South Africa) and is omitted again from the Test squad, he should step away from the Big Bash League completely to work on his action.

It is a similar scenario that Phil Hughes faced last summer.

When his technique failed him and saw him dropped from the Test team, he bypassed the BBL, believing club cricket was a more appropriate option.

The irony of this all is that the Big Bash League, which starts tonight, will be the only form of domestic cricket being played around the upcoming Test series against Sri Lanka.

Shaun Marsh last summer was an example of a guy firing in the BBL, getting into the Baggy Green and getting out recklessly.

Surely the timing of the Big Bash League needs to be reassessed.

Some form of more domestic substantial cricket being played around a Test series would be more beneficial  for all parties.

Because, as Hilfenhaus proves, too much T20 can be damaging to a Test cricketer.

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