Women of the World event at City Baptist Church

COMING TOGETHER: Women of the World coordinator Robyn Flittner at City Baptist Church on Saturday. Picture: Sean Slatter
COMING TOGETHER: Women of the World coordinator Robyn Flittner at City Baptist Church on Saturday. Picture: Sean Slatter

The virtues of equality and respect demonstrated at last weekend’s Global Village Celebration were on show again at the City Baptist Church on Saturday night. 

More than 100 women of varying backgrounds came together for the inaugural Women of the World showcase.

Part of the Tamar Valley Peace festival, the event featured traditional dancing, storytelling, and authentic cuisine.

Coordinator Robyn Flittner said the gathering was designed for women to “share their cultures in a meaningful way”. 

“It’s a womens-only event to celebrate different journeys and what it means to re-settle here,” she said.

“Refugees and migrants all have unique stories, so we wanted to create a deeper understanding of where these women have come from.

“The dancing is also very important, because each culture has its own way of expressing itself.

“The traditional dancing can be quite vibrant.”

As with the Global Village Celebration, the Launceston Women’s Friendship Group was well represented on the night.

Established three years ago, the group has complemented its weekly meetings with contributions at various community events.

Ms Flittner said Launceston was well-suited to host events that featured cultural sharing.

“There is a lot of good will out there for our refugees and migrants and I think a lot of people here really embrace them,” she said.

“It is especially evident in gatherings like Women of the World, where we have a lot of volunteers come out of the woodwork to help put it together.”

More than 10 cultures were in attendance, including Sudanese, Congolese, Pacific Islander, Bhutanese, Afghan hazara, Burmese, Aboriginal, Korean, Tongan, Somoan, Indonesian and Papua New Guinea.

Ms Flittner said the event could potentially develop to include other demographics.

“It could morph into something else,” she said.

“If there is enough interest, we could hold a day in the park, which would include families.

“It all just depends on how it is received and what people think should be the next step.”