University of Tasmania announces John Wardle Architects as principal consultant for campus move

Three Tasmanian architect firms will partner with a Victorian-based one to deliver the University of Tasmania’s Northern Transformation project.

Internationally renowned architects John Wardle Architects has been appointed principal consultant for the campus redevelopment alongside Tasmanian architects Room 11, 1+2 Architects and Philp Lighton. 

UTAS vice-chancellor Rufus Black said the appointment of the architects marked an exciting stage in the project.

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“As a team, these architects bring world leading skills and expertise and a local focus and shared passion for Tasmania,” Professor Black said.

All three Tasmanian firms are UTAS alumni.

JWA is based in Melbourne but has strong links to Tasmania. The practice worked with the university to design the new Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies on Hobart’s waterfront, and Mr Wardle’s own property on Bruny Island is home to two projects – the Shearers Quarters and Captain Kelly’s Cottage, which have won major architectural prizes at the state, national and international level.

JWA has worked on a number of large scale tertiary education projects including the Melbourne School of Design at the University of Melbourne and the Learning and Teaching Building at Monash University.

Work by John Wardle Architects, who have been appointed principal consultation, alongside three Tasmanian architects for the Northern Transformation project.

Work by John Wardle Architects, who have been appointed principal consultation, alongside three Tasmanian architects for the Northern Transformation project.

“This is truly a partnership of great talents – Room11 and John Wardle Architects were the only Australian practices invited to exhibit at the International Architecture Biennale in Venice this year,” Professor Black said.

The Northern Transformation is a $300 million project that will see new campuses built at West Park in Burnie and Inveresk in Launceston in a partnership between the University and local, state and federal governments.

Professor Black said community and stakeholder engagement during the detailed design phase would be crucial to the success of the new campuses.

Building on the consultation work with stakeholders and the community over recent years, the co-design process will see a range of opportunities to provide input to the final detailed designs. 

Development applications for West Park in Burnie and Inveresk in Launceston are scheduled to be lodged by October and the end of the year respectively.