March for Science Tasmania puts science in the spotlight

CODE BLOODED: March for Science Tasmania organiser Cassandre Tickner-Smith braces for a wet walk at the March for Science in Launceston on Saturday. Picture: Paul Scambler
CODE BLOODED: March for Science Tasmania organiser Cassandre Tickner-Smith braces for a wet walk at the March for Science in Launceston on Saturday. Picture: Paul Scambler

Science affects Tasmanians every day, yet the intangible effects are often overlooked.

That was one of the reasons Spatial Industries Business Association chief executive officer Deanna Hutchinson said she was marching for science on Saturday.

Ms Hutchinson said science enabled her to run an international organisation, which has its headquarters in Brisbane and operates between Perth, Western Australia and Tahiti, from Longford.

“Science is invisible,” Ms Hutchinson said.

“If we can’t see it, it’s working but there is danger of it being taken for granted.”

Ms Hutchinson spoke at the Launceston march at the Queen Victoria Museum at Inveresk.

There were a lot of complex question that needed to be answered, she said.

Yet evidence often was not viewed as important as politics and funding, Ms Hutchinson said.

People marched in eight cities in Australia, joining thousands across the world.

Australians needed to drive the science agenda and continue to develop incredible research and innovations, she said.