Prospect Hawks juniors provide a football home for the Boyacks and the McCormacks

FAMILY CLUB: Jordan, Mikayla, Alicia, and Alanah Boyacks join Conall, Oisin, Lee and Tiernan McCormack at Prospect Hawks. Picture: Scott Gelston.
FAMILY CLUB: Jordan, Mikayla, Alicia, and Alanah Boyacks join Conall, Oisin, Lee and Tiernan McCormack at Prospect Hawks. Picture: Scott Gelston.

Prospect first adopted the famous Hawthorn moniker.

Now the junior Hawks are mimicking the AFL family club’s mantra – literally.

Eight siblings from two families – the Boyacks and the McCormacks – will turn out for the burgeoning club.

Never before has the Prospect Hawks seen so many faces that share the same dinner tables or fight each morning for the bathrooms.

“To be quite honest, it’s the first time that we’ve come across this at this club – certainly in my time,” junior club president Chris Ryan.

“It’s certainly got that [Daniher brothers] ring to it.”

The Hawks even have a number of sets of twins on the books at the junior club.

Alanah Boyack, 14, heads the football matriarchy in the Hadspen family.

The inaugural girls youth best-and-fairest winner last year shows up Mikayla, 13 and Alicia, 9, while brother Jordan, 10, attempts to outplay his combative sisters. 

Conall McCormack, 14, also leads the way for his family that emigrated from Ireland just four years ago.

The under-12 Tasmanian representative – after only two years playing the game – from 2016 has got some stiff competition from Tieran, 13, Lee, 11 and Oisin, 9 amid the latest footy battles in their Prospect Vale backyard.

The McCormacks and the Boyacks joined teammates on Thursday night at a Hawthorn AFL and women’s VFL super clinic at Prospect Park.

Ryan who on International Women’s Day on Thursday said that sort of inclusiveness was not something possible even a decade back.

“We’ve found out, particular over the last two years, that junior girls’ football at our club has accelerated quite a bit with numbers, which is really good,” he said.

“We’re now finding we’re getting a lot more sisters of the boys that play at the club.

“It means we are getting more families involved.

“That’s particularly good for a junior football club like ours because once you have boys and girls both involved that gives your group a more family-orientated culture.”