Entally House hosts 2017 D'Attelage de Tradition carriage driving competition held by Tasmanian Horse Drawn Vehicle Foundation

Trot on: Four-year-old mare Willow, drivne by Jill Cawsey, at the D'attelage de Tradition at Entally House. Picture: Lucy Stone
Trot on: Four-year-old mare Willow, drivne by Jill Cawsey, at the D'attelage de Tradition at Entally House. Picture: Lucy Stone

Tradition, style, elegance and performance – everything the judges of the D’Attelage de Tradition sought in the historic competition at Entally House on Saturday.

The carriage driving competition is a combination of history and sport, giving drivers and their horses the opportunity to test their mettle in a range of competitive tests, as well as their traditional carriage style.

The D’Attelage de Tradition aims to preserve the skills and crafts associated with horse and carriage such as coach and harness making and driving skills.

Seven competitors trotted out through the grounds of beautiful Entally House, from the smallest Shetland to a 17-hand Percheron cross Standardbred.

Judges Michael MacDonald said the standard of entrants had been excellent.

“It’s lovely to see a lot of hard work paying off, with so many people putting the effort in to keep the sport going,” fellow judge Rozzie Ferguson-Pelley said.

The D’Attelage was hosted by the Tasmanian Horse Drawn Vehicle Foundation to test drivers on a seven-kilometre route around Entally House, followed by technical challenges such as backing into a garage and stopping on a line.

A final fast trial around cones tested the skill of the drivers and confidence of their horses.