Letters to the editor | November 29, 2017

ARTHUR THE BRAVE: Two-year-old Arthur Long at the Riverside Golf Club. A fundraiser was held at the club for Arthur. Picture: Scott Gelston
ARTHUR THE BRAVE: Two-year-old Arthur Long at the Riverside Golf Club. A fundraiser was held at the club for Arthur. Picture: Scott Gelston

Thank You

ON BEHALF of the Riverside Lions Club and the Riverside Golf Club, we would like to sincerely thank all those people who contributed to the success of the charity golf day on November 17 in support of young meningococcal survivor, Arthur Long.

There were many people involved in the organisation of the event and many individuals and businesses who contributed generously and who made the day a great success.

We raised more than $36,000 to assist young Arthur and his parents in the many medical procedures that lie ahead, as he recovers from his illness.

To all those who participated in the golf day or who attended the dinner, we thank you for helping such a worthy cause.  

David Vautin, Mark Brown and Len Healey, Riverside.

Boland Street cottage site

THE decision by the City of Launceston Council to approve a multi-unit complex on the derelict Boland Street cottage site is a further reflection of surging confidence in Northern Tasmania. Just like the C H. Smith site, these dilapidated cottages have been an eyesore for decades. 

It was pleasing to see the council work cooperatively with the developer and the architects in regard to adjusting the height of the complex and the set-back from the street. This sort of can-do attitude is what has always defined Launceston and the private enterprise entrepreneurship of Northern Tasmania.

There is no doubt that the planned $260 million UTAS relocation to Inveresk is helping to increase confidence in the city and across the region.

With the C. H. Smith and Silos Hotel developments surging ahead and several other major hotel  developments close to proceeding this all means more jobs in the North and the ability to host more tourists.

Peter Gutwein, Treasurer.

Passing cyclists safely

Tania Venn (The Examiner, November 21), describes a recent encounter in Launceston with a bus traveling on her side of the road.

The driver was passing a pair of cyclists and gave them 1.5 metre clearance (more than the one metre required in a 60 km/h zone) leading to their encounter.

She then asks, "So my question is: is the safety of a bike rider more important than my safety? I don't think so." We all have a right to safety, regardless of our mode of travel and it is incumbent on all road users to bear this in mind. It is not for drivers to decide whose life is worth more.

The website www.amygillett.org.au/a-metre-matters-faq is well worth a read, giving the reasons for such an approach and its positive effect on both cyclists and drivers alike.

I hope Ms Venn has recovered sufficiently from her near miss and will take the time to look at the website.

Michael McOwan, Trevallyn.

Invermay Traffic 

THE Invermay Traffic Investigation Report is due to be completed by the end of 2017 (The Examiner, November 14). It would seem the intersection of lindsay and Goderich Streets which is adjacent to Charles Street Bridge is the worst performing intersection in Launceston, this is before any further development such as the Silo’s complex and planned expansion in the area abounding Bunnings.

Will a similar study be initiated at the Tamar Bridge end of Lindsay Street? Not according to the City of Launceston Council at its meeting on  November 21.

They intend to whack some traffic lights up and then hope that the area can cope with the 30,000-plus vehicle movements a day, this is before the UTAS campus is built, which will add another 15,000-plus.

Is the campus considered a poor cousin to an hotel development, it does seem that some intersections are more equal than others.

Ron Baines, Kings Meadows.

Prank Call

I RECEIVED a call from an individual purporting to be from a free government help agency for the aged, and as I had just seen my doctor in regards to an injured shoulder I assumed they had been contacted by him on my behalf. 

Surprise, surprise after gleaning as much of my private information as he could in order to check whether I was eligible for the service I started to get concerned, and just as well as he was no less than a sales rep trying to sell me expensive medical equipment, all the while  trying to convince me of the dangers of what equipment I already own. 

Even after my refusal to purchase the items, saying as they were Australian they were the only legal items of their kind, I declined whereupon he made a call to head office to secure me a cheaper deal, and started once more with the marked down prices. My advice to fellow elders is, buyer beware.

Don Davey, Launceston.

Multiculturalism

I SYMPATHISE with Anne Brelsford of Legana (The Examiner, November 24).

A few years ago I wrote a letter to The Examiner about the desirability of a multicultural Australia.  My letter was cut out from the paper and returned anonymously to my home with the comment: “Go home, wog”.  

Are we not all “wogs” in one way or another in this land that belonged so recently to the Aboriginals?  We came here uninvited by the traditional owners.  Perhaps the virtues of generosity and empathy would not come amiss

Hassanah Wilkinson, Legana

Offensive Place Names

MICK LEPPARD (The Examiner, November 21) suggests that we leave offensive names as they are. It simply astounds me that in 2017 anyone would not support the changing of despicable and racist names like 'Niggerhead Rock'. Likewise, names for places like 'Victory Hill', given by whites gloating about the killings of Aborigines.

Any fair-minded human being, I am sure, would much prefer such disgusting nomenclature changed - and why not change it back to the original place name - karanutung (Niggerhead Rock) and timuk (Victory Hill).

Theresa Sainty, Glenorchy.