Tasmania Fire Service extends fire permit period to Launceston, George Town, Flinders Island

With warmer weather predicted Tasmania Fire Service has extended its permit period to include Launceston, Flinders Island and George Town.

As of midnight Wednesday, November 15, landowners need to apply for a permit before conducting burns on their properties.

Across the north, a fire permit period was already in place for Break O'Day, Dorset and Northern Midlands council areas.

Landowners who wish to continue to conduct burns are still encouraged to do so, however, they are now required to undertake the simple process of obtaining a fire permit ...

TFS chief officer Chris Arnol

In the south, permits are required in Brighton, Central Highlands, Clarence, Derwent Valley, Glamorgan-Spring Bay, Glenorchy, Hobart, Huon Valley, Kingborough, Sorell, Tasman and Southern Midlands council areas.

TFS chief officer Chris Arnol said the aim of a fire permit period was to reduce the chance of fires escaping, particularly with below average rainfall in the North and dry spells on the East Coast, North-East Coast and Flinders Island.

"Landowners who wish to continue to conduct burns are still encouraged to do so, however, they are now required to undertake the simple process of obtaining a fire permit from a local fire permit officer, which offers a certain level of protection when landowners adhere to the fire permits conditions," Mr Arnol said.

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The permit period follows a 7500-hectare bushfire at St Helens last month, which Tasmania Fire Service investigators believe started from an extinguished burn-off that reignited.

The blaze burned for several weeks and was the first significant bushfire of the season, forcing police to close roads and an emergency warning to be issued when it travelled towards properties on Terryvale Road at Goshen.

While the fire has been contained, continued dry conditions on the East Coast have seen Parks and Wildlife ban fires at a number of reserves.

The restrictions apply to all campgrounds from Mt William National Park along the East Coast to Orford, including Maria Island, and Lime Bay in the South-East.

Campfires, pot fires and all open fires that use wood, charcoal or other solid or liquid fuel are banned.

Parks and Wildlife Service state fire manager Paul Black said community and visitor safety was a priority. 

"The fire risk in these areas is not going to diminish until significant rainfall is received and until that time we ask those visiting our parks and reserves to heed these restrictions for their own safety and that of the community,” he said.

To find out more about applying for a permit call 1800 000 699 or visit www.fire.tas.gov.au.

Stay up to date on fire restrictions at campgrounds at parks.tas.gov.au.