Addition of Mona Foma adds to our culture

MONA FOMA curator Brian Ritchie.

MONA FOMA curator Brian Ritchie.

Launceston will be the place to be this summer.

The events are endless – some new and some that are permanently on the social calendar.

We will be hosting our first Big Bash game at the University of Tasmania stadium in December. Following this will be the Launceston Cup, the polo at Barnbougle, Festivale, and rounding out the events will be popular music festival Party in the Paddock.

And now we can add Mona Foma.

These events are unique enough to cater for different interests, yet still attract some cross-over in audience.

They also cater to different budgets and lifestyles.

That’s why it’s not a surprise that Mona Foma has been embraced by Launceston tourism, arts and community stakeholders.

Junction Arts Festival, the University of Tasmania, the City of Launceston, Tourism Northern Tasmania, Launceston Chamber of Commerce, Northern Tasmania Development and local arts practitioners have all backed MoFo’s move to the North.

The festival’s shift of home isn’t just an economic advantage for Launceston. Although it will be a valuable boost for our tourism sector as well as our retail and hospitality businesses.

MoFo embraces our rich and diverse arts culture.  It encourages creativity, innovation and taking a risk. Something Launceston is doing very well at the moment.

We have strong development, increased private investment and projects that challenge what our future as a region can be.

There is often talk of a MONA-effect since the museum opened in Hobart. It’s pleasing to see that MoFo will be adding to this growth in our region, not creating it.

Anyone who has visited MONA or attended one of its festivals can relate to feelings of shock, unease and passion. 

The MONA exhibitions and events challenge how we see the world and how we view ourselves.

“Festivals like Mona Foma in Launceston can inspire us, transport us to new ways of thinking, divert us from group think, and discomfort and shock us in a way that liberates and challenges our creative selves,” Northern Tasmania Development Corporation chief executive officer Maree Tatlow said.

“We need more of these types of events here, as they help underpin the cultural change work required in the region which is at the core of an innovative society.”