UTAS student Brielle Quigley makes her commitment to rugby sevens

HARD YARDS: Brielle Quigley moves from a pick and run in last year's Northern Tasmanian rugby sevens carnival game for Launceston Bees. Picture: Phillip Biggs
HARD YARDS: Brielle Quigley moves from a pick and run in last year's Northern Tasmanian rugby sevens carnival game for Launceston Bees. Picture: Phillip Biggs

Brielle Quigley may fit the old-fashioned and stodgy rugby ethos of a healthy body equates to a healthy mind.

But it’s fast-paced rugby sevens – not the traditional 15-a-side game – that appeals to the first-year uni student.

The ex-Scotch school rower and sometimes netballer is hooked on sevens since converting last year with the Launceston Queen Bees. 

“I was always very focused on academics – that was something I always wanted to pursue first,” Quigley said.

“But it wasn’t until I started playing this rugby, just because I missed team sport as I had always played it, that I realised I am getting quite good at this and that I found a bit of a niche.”

Quigley does confess the Australian Rio gold medallists last year first aroused her interest in the seven-a-side rugby format.

But in less than 12 months under the guidance of former Test Wallaby Luke Burgess, she has picked up the game from curious novice to running alongside Olympians.

“It’s been such an amazing experience to start playing it – I have just fell in love with the sport,” Quigley said.

“Sevens is so fast-paced and that is part of the appeal to it.

“It’s quick games, it’s harder running, harder tackling even – some might disagree, but for me it’s nice and quick, fast-paced and full on.”

LADY IN RED: Quigley gets her first feel for the UTAS Lions kit.

LADY IN RED: Quigley gets her first feel for the UTAS Lions kit.

One of four Launceston born-and-bred players to play for UTAS Lions in the National University Sevens Series, the psychology major will run out on home turf.

The chance to create not only rugby sevens, but Tasmanian and women’s sporting history at UTAS Stadium in this unique tournament-style series has Quigley in raptures.

“It’s very, very exciting that something this big is coming here to be honest,” she said.

“I am getting butterflies just thinking about it – it’s going to be one of the most surreal experiences, but also so exciting thinking about.

“It’s great as well that it is local especially for us from Launceston as it means so many family members, friends, colleagues and those sorts pf people can come and watch.”