Tasmanian short-term rentals generate more than $160 million

Jordan Condo

Jordan Condo

More than $22 million was generated by short-term rental accommodations in the Launceston, Tamar and North region last year.

A new report released by ACIL Allen Consulting highlighted the benefits of short-term rental market on regional areas.

Overall, it provided a $166 million boost to the Tasmanian economy.

TOURISM BOOST: More than $165 million was generated by the short-term rental accommodation market in Tasmania last year. Graphic: Keisuke Osawa

TOURISM BOOST: More than $165 million was generated by the short-term rental accommodation market in Tasmania last year. Graphic: Keisuke Osawa

Stayz corporate affairs director Jordan Condo said Tasmania was benefiting from its unique, independent brand.

The state’s short-term rental accommodation market was a “significant contributor” to the gross domestic product, Mr Condo said.

More than 201,000 nights of accommodation were booked with Tasmanian short-term rental providers last year.

Short-term rental accommodation generated up to $23.1 million in economic activity in the East Coast, which was 5.2 per cent of the gross regional product for the area.

In the North West, $14.6 million was generated by short-term rentals.

Mr Condo said “short-term rentals have been an Australian holiday tradition for many years and online platforms such as Stayz have helped facilitate and expand this pastime to the benefit of regional towns across Tasmania”.

Liffey Mountain Retreat co-owner Sandy Howell said entering the short-term rental market helped to cover her mortgage.

“We get to showcase the area. It’s such a beautiful area, but not many people know about Liffey,” Ms Howell said.

In the past 10 months, there had been about 60 separate booking ranging in stays from two to nine nights. “It opens up a whole area to people.”

She estimated about 75 per cent of visitors were from the mainland, with the remaining people from overseas or from Tasmania.

Ms Howell set a two night minimum so people would have the opportunity to explore the area, instead of potentially arriving at night and leaving the next morning.

Tasmanian Hospitality Association general manager Steve Old said the association welcomed any visitors to Tasmania that stay in any form of accommodation.

“They generally eat and drink in our restaurants and other establishments and help make these businesses profitable and employ more Tasmanians.”