West Launceston man on trial for trafficking ice

A West Launceston man is standing trial this week, three years after police found more than 700 grams of ice and nearly $34,000 cash at his home.

Adam Maxwell Cox pleaded not guilty to one count of trafficking and two counts of dealing with proceeds of crime in the Launceston Supreme Court on Monday. In February 2014, Tasmania Police detectives executed a search warrant at Mr Cox’s home in Neika Avenue.

During the search, they found one large bag of ice, smaller quantities of ice, digital scales and two bundles of cash, mostly made up of $50 notes – totaling $28,900 in one bundle and $5000 in the other.

The quantities of ice were found in various locations of the house, including the cupboard of the main bedroom, a wooden blanket box and under the passenger side floor mat of a Toyota Hilux ute, which was parked in a driveway outside of the property – a total of 771.5 grams was uncovered.

After the raid, items seized from the home were sent to Hobart for testing by Forensic Science Services Tasmania. The substances were found to be “high-grade methylamphetamine”.

A string of police witnesses took to the stand in front of a jury on Monday, for the first day of what is expected to be a four-day long trial. Two of those witnesses were Senior Constable Rodney Walker and First-Class Constable Brett Tyson from the Tasmania Police forensics unit in Launceston.

Both Senior Constable Walker and First-Class Constable Tyson were involved in the initial search of Mr Cox’s home in 2014, photographing evidence. The jury panel was provided with copies of those photo exhibits, including images of the drugs and cash found in the home of the accused.

In her opening address, defence lawyer Fran McCracken told the jury the majority of facts in the case were agreed, including the amount of drugs and cash found and the type of drugs.

Ms McCracken said what is disputed in the case, however, is Mr Cox’s knowledge about “each and every” quantity of drugs and cash.

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