Launceston artist Frederick Strange to be exhibited at QVMAG

FREDERICK FAN: Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery guest curator Yvonne Adkins with artwork by Frederick Strange. Picture: Neil Richardson.

FREDERICK FAN: Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery guest curator Yvonne Adkins with artwork by Frederick Strange. Picture: Neil Richardson.

He was one of Launceston’s most important, if not mysterious artists and now the work of Frederick Strange is set to line the walls of Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery as part of a new exhibition.

Opening on Monday, June 19, The Enigmatic Mr Strange, Creating a Past: The life and art of Frederick Strange c. 1807-1873 feature images of Launceston from the early 1840s to the early 1860s.

The works depict public buildings, homesteads, churches, the Tamar River, Cataract Gorge and large views of the city. 

Guest Curator and Honorary Research Associate Yvonne Adkins said the pieces reflect a specific point in time in the town’s history.

“I think the reason why they are so important is because they show Launceston in 1859,” she said.

“It was a time when photography was just starting to take place, and you see that he really gives a sense of atmosphere.” 

Strange was transported from Nottingham, England to Van Diemen's Land after committing a series of burglaries in 1837. He was granted a leave pass for good behaviour and arrived in Launceston in 1841. 

QVMAG director Richard Mulvaney hoped the gallery’s exhibition would lead to a greater understanding of Strange as an artist.

“He never signed his work, so we have to go on style to identify one of his pieces,” he said.

“People may discover they have one his paintings after coming here, which is exactly what we want to happen.”

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