Army Museum of Tasmania remembers sacrifice of 40th Battalion

More than 100 years have passed since the 40th Battalion left Tasmania, but its legacy will not be forgotten this Anzac Day. 

Many of the Battalion of Tasmanian soldiers would go on to sacrifice their lives on the battlefields of France and Belgium.

This year, the Army Museum of Tasmania is commemorating Australia’s military history through its new Six-Bob-A-Day Tourists exhibition in Hobart. 

Images of war are scattered throughout the museum, both of soldiers in battle and back in Tasmania, showing the true sacrifice of war. 

Museum manager Chris Talbot said the majority of images displayed were sourced from Tasmanian families.

“They’re images from the battlefield in the First World War, mainly Europe, but also some images from home looking at important parts of Anzac Day,” Major Talbot said. 

“Part of the exhibition focuses on the 40th Battalion leaving Tasmanian shores in 1916, through to 1918, and the subsequent year when the troops came home.

“We respectfully and accurately record and highlight where Tasmanians have defended their country, many of whom making the ultimate sacrifice for their nation, state and community.”

During those years, six Tasmanians were awarded a Victoria Cross for bravery. 

Owen Winter has been at the museum for 24 years and said it was fantastic to share Tasmania’s important military history with the next generation. 

“The centenary of Anzac developed a terrific amount of public interest and we noticed that here,” he said. 

HISTORY: Army Museum of Tasmania manager Chris Talbot and volunteer Owen Winter prepare to commemorate Anzac Day. Picture: Michelle Wisbey

HISTORY: Army Museum of Tasmania manager Chris Talbot and volunteer Owen Winter prepare to commemorate Anzac Day. Picture: Michelle Wisbey

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