Letters to the editor

Brian P. Khan, of Bridport, believes the problems with the Tamar River will never be overcome until all treatment plants in the catchment area are brought to tertiary level.

Brian P. Khan, of Bridport, believes the problems with the Tamar River will never be overcome until all treatment plants in the catchment area are brought to tertiary level.

Tamar River

The advice received from TasWater was they only have to achieve secondary sewage treatment for marine and estuary rivers to comply with the  EPA. One cannot complain against TasWater as they are only meeting the regulations made by the EPA 2001. The EPA need to have parliament to amend the Act from secondary, to read tertiary treatment. The problems with the Tamar will never be overcome until all treatment plants in the catchment area are brought to tertiary level. Mr Collier should also refer to Mr Birchmore’s comments to the Public Accounts Committee and how close Invermay and Inveresk were to a disaster, and has he received advice from the Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee as stated, he would know that he would refer to Hydro over increasing water levels to 18 cumecs.

Brian P. Khan, Bridport.

Recognition

GAYE Anderson, you are not alone amongst many who complain about the lack of recognition given by The National Trust of Tasmania to its many Volunteers. Their lack of courtesy in this area has become legendary. Equally those who make donations to their collection are often ignored. The new Trust shop at Evandale is of course a national National Trust venture, but I join with you in acknowledging the valuable contribution being made by all of the Tasmanian Trust’s volunteers and particularly those at The Old Umbrella Shop. The people there are an example of all that is wonderful in volunteering and they are a credit to Tasmania.

Len Langan, Longford.

Proposed Maritime Technical College

IT IS GROSSLY ironic that at the same time as the University of Tasmania has signed a MOU with four leading French institutions involved with design and build of Australia’s next submarine fleet, Christopher Pyne is busily arranging alternatives in his home state. In announcing this linking of the Maritime College with these French firms, UTas Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Monique Skidmore said this recognised the world standing of the AMC in both teaching and research. “This MOU will result in the university working with our French partners to deliver teaching and research which will inform the next generation submarine fleet,” Prof Skidmore said. Surely Mr Pyne is not going to jeopardise that arrangement? It is apparent that TAFE colleges across the nation will have a role in preparing the skilled workforce necessary to actually build this future naval shipping without the need for a new technical college.

Dick James, Launceston.

Human life

HOW REFRESHING, to note the defence of human life by Geoff McLean (The Examiner March 29). His view demonstrates His respect for human life, which is shared by the greater number of Australians. Murder is a heinous crime and it should never again be met with an equally heinous murder, sanctioned by the law. There is only one answer for such crime and that should be jail, for life, the rest of his or her life. Interestingly, euthanasia and abortion are also the taking of human life, yet we allow abortion under the law. Both of these actions mean the killing of another human being. The reasons given for such actions are hardly a credible defence, but abortion is already lawful. Euthanasia Is currently waiting in the wings in Tasmania, New South Wales and Victoria, with supporters demanding it be made legal, for those who wish to opt out life, at a time of their choosing and whilst they are capable of making the decision themselves. Problem is, euthanasia requires a compliant doctor who has no objection to taking a human life. There is no dignity in assisted suicide. How hypocritical then, is all the hype about preventing suicide, which attracts huge funding and jobs for counsellors and others involved in education and other programs in this effort.

Mary T. Bates, Exeter.