The Driving Our Future campaign examines Northern Tasmania's economy

Northern Tasmania, like many regional areas, has struggled with a changing economy. For that to improve, we must be agents of our own success.

To drive discussion about improving economic performance in our region, examine the challenges and issues of Northern Tasmania’s economy, and highlighting the innovators injecting fresh ideas into our region, The Examiner launched the Driving Our Future campaign.

The fundamental question we are asking is: What will future proof Tasmania for the next generation?

March 6

Knowledge is power: Higher education is a clear driver of regional economies and should be encouraged at every opportunity in Northern Tasmania. But what other areas and ideas will future proof the North?

Knowledge is power: Higher education is a clear driver of regional economies and should be encouraged at every opportunity in Northern Tasmania. But what other areas and ideas will future proof the North?

North driving change

Northern Tasmania, like many regional areas, has struggled with a changing economy. For that to improve, we must be agents of our own success, writes Fairfax Tasmania managing editor Mark Baker. Read more

State’s plan for the year ahead

The state government has released its planned projects for the next 12 months, the bulk of which fall into the ‘jobs and economic growth’ category. Read more

Change will support the region: NTDC

Northern Tasmania’s economic status and unemployment rate has been described as “unacceptable” by the region’s peak development corporation. Read more

March 14

Tourism jobs beckon

Passengers flying between Launceston and Melbourne increased 5.9 per cent to 918,500 in the year to September, aviation statistics show. Flights taking the route grew 4.5 per cent from 690 in September last year to 721 in the same month during 2016. Read more

Assistant Minister for Cities and Digital Transformation Angus Taylor and Launceston mayor Albert van Zetten in Civic Square. Picture: Scott Gelston

Assistant Minister for Cities and Digital Transformation Angus Taylor and Launceston mayor Albert van Zetten in Civic Square. Picture: Scott Gelston

Revamp plans to create a new city

University of Tasmania’s ambitious campus move may be a cornerstone of Launceston’s impending City Deal but federal Assistant Cities Minister Angus Taylor says it is only one way to transform the area. Read more

March 20

Carving its own future

When one door closes, a window often opens.

The national and statewide manufacturing industry has been undergoing immense change, with the loss of car manufacturing in Australia. The final car manufacturing plant, Toyota’s Altona plant in Victoria, closed its doors last year.

However, in a back room of a small office space in Launceston, the revolution of manufacturing in Tasmania is taking place. Read more

April 2

Universities’ pivotal role

Universities are increasingly becoming pivotal players in shaping the future of regions, and UTAS will play a particularly important role with its move to the centre of Launceston. Read more.

April 10

Start-up risk pays off

On an afternoon run in New York’s Central Park, an unlikely offer changed Andy Fist’s life. 

The Launceston-born strategy consultant was jogging with an Australian friend in the leafy city park, and developed a business partnership by chance. Read more.

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