Laser offers new solution for pet woes

HEALING: Longford Veterinary Clinic's Dr Martina McPeace uses the new laser treatment on Hugo. Picture: Zona Black

HEALING: Longford Veterinary Clinic's Dr Martina McPeace uses the new laser treatment on Hugo. Picture: Zona Black

Pet owners in Northern Tasmania now have easier access to a drug and surgery free treatment.

Longford Veterinary Clinic recently bought a $40,000 laser treatment machine, which the clinic’s Martina McPeace says is the only one of its kind in Northern Tasmania.

Dr McPeace said that in the first two weeks of having the machine, she had already been amazed by its effectiveness.

“I treated a cat with a bladder infection, and after one treatment it was back to normal,” Dr McPeace said.

“It’s really good for cats, because when they’re sore, they don’t want to be held.

“With this, you don’t need to hold them too much, like you would with a needle.”

The non-invasive treatment uses laser light to stimulate circulation and bloodflow beneath the skin.

Dr McPeace said the treatment did not replace conventional vetinerary care, but complemented it.

She said it showed a 30 to 50 per cent acceleration of wound healing, either self-sustained or post-surgery, as well as helping with back pain, inflammations, infections, and soft tissue trauma.

“It’s similar to photosynthesis in plants,” Dr McPeace said.

“The laser stimulates the area of interest, and helps to promote circulation, bringing more oxygen and nutrients.

“It improves the energy in the area. With that energy it speeds up the healing process.”

It’s a treatment that she was commonplace in the US, but was only just starting to creep into Australia.

Its other benefit is its pricepoint.

“People don’t have $2500 to spend on a surgery that may not work, but let’s give this a go at $37.50 a treatment and see if it helps,” Dr McPeace said.

She added that the recommended number of treatments was four.

“Until the laser arrived, animal owners in the North and North-West were forced to take their animals to Hobart for the treatment, an ordeal for many of the sick animals.”

Dr McPeace was required to undergo training and accreditation in order to practice with the laser.