Letters to the editor

Robert Lee, of Summerhill, says Australia cannot afford another closure of a major manufacturing industry such as the recent demise of Ford plants in Victoria.

Robert Lee, of Summerhill, says Australia cannot afford another closure of a major manufacturing industry such as the recent demise of Ford plants in Victoria.

Manufacturing Blues

AUSTRALIA can ill afford another closure of a major manufacturing industry such as the recent demise of Ford's Geelong and Broadmeadows car assembly plants. 

There are now 600 ex-Ford workers without a job, and through no fault of their own. In relation to all this, let's  hope the government strikes the correct balance of refugee intake with Aussie workers who are now looking for work, so neither are left without a fair days pay.  

Robert Lee, Summerhill.

GT Council Meeting

MR NEILSEN has misrepresented the facts of George Town Council's recent meeting at Hillwood (The Examiner, October 12). 

Answers were forthcoming for all questions that were asked, the answers were either provided on the spot or taken on notice and a response provided in writing later in accordance with normal practice. 

The question time policy Mr Neilsen refers to in no way restricts the public from asking questions but sets down guidelines for expected standards of respectful behaviour and provides an equal opportunity for everybody to participate. 

A standard not upheld by Mr Neilsen at the recent meeting when he persistently interjected and repeatedly refused my call to order. 

The audio recording of the council meeting is available on council's website or may be obtained from the council office.

Bridget Archer, George Town.

Aboriginal Recognition

THE Hodgman government set up an inquiry to find out if Aboriginal people wanted constitutional recognition. We told the inquiry we did not. 

We saw from similar mainland experience the disappointment Aboriginals felt when they were given token recognition. We suggested the better way to recognise what had happened to Aboriginals in Tasmania was to address dispossession, domination and disadvantage.

The Liberals started land returns in 1995 and while we still have less than 1 per cent of the 67,000 square kilometres we used to have, the process of land return was credible and meaningful. Token recognition does not create any rights in Aboriginals or impose any obligations on government. 

The whole exercise has been a distraction from land returns, four-wheel drive damage to Aboriginal heritage, and doing something about poor Aboriginal education retention rates and over-imprisonment.

Our views were clearly ignored and whether we like it or not, the Tasmanian parliament will impose this on us, against our will. Recognition should be meaningful and the beneficiaries dignified. 

How would same-sex supporters feel if, instead of gaining legal equality, they were offered token recognition? How would flood victims like to be ‘recognised’ but then left to fend for themselves?

Without any discussion with us about the better way forward, Madeleine Ogilvie, ALP spokesperson on Aboriginal Affairs, said her party supported the token Bill. It may be that people like Mr Hodgman, Ms Ogilvie and the committee members mean well. But their combined move is to make themselves, not Aboriginals, feel good. 

Michael Mansell, Launceston.

MH 17 Tragedy

IN RELATION to the MH17 tragedy, Russia has chosen to express its opposition to the demands of the United Nations Security Council. This may be a positive move by Russia to bring some fairness into the international communities’ judicial system. 

Australia has been quick to lay all the blame at Russia’s feet for the downing of MH17. Early in the journey, Russia had not been asked to be part of any investigation or enquiry. What we see as justice doesn’t seem to resonate in the international arena. Now the expectation is for Russia to fill in the blanks. 

Gary Daly, Launceston.

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