Definium Technologies develops sensors for Sense-T

COMMUNICATION: Mike Cruse, Catherine Caruana-McManus and Andrew Maggio discuss how the agriculture sector can benefit from surface mount electronics assembling equipment. Picture: Neil Richardson

COMMUNICATION: Mike Cruse, Catherine Caruana-McManus and Andrew Maggio discuss how the agriculture sector can benefit from surface mount electronics assembling equipment. Picture: Neil Richardson

Governments and IT industries have discussed a plan to build an Internet of Things network which can be used in improving agricultural productivity, cementing Launceston’s push to become a smart city.  

Digital innovators met with CSIRO, Launceston City Council, UTAS, and state government representatives in Tasmania’s first major Internet of Things forum.

Launceston company Definium Technologies has collaborated with Hobart-based company Sense-T to develop sensors for the agricultural, aquaculture and horticulture sectors. 

Sense-T have developed a data platform which uses sensors to monitor health, grazing and productivity in dairy and livestock industries.

The information can then be accessed by farmers on their smart phones. 

Definium Technologies chief executive Mike Cruse said the LoRaWAN network would allow working prototypes to be tested.

“The end goal is to build a number of communications gateways, communicating with thousands of sensors, the gateways are inexpensive…and we can build sensors that fill particular needs,” Mr Cruse said.

He said sensors developed by Definium were already being used to monitor energy use for pumping stations at a dairy near Bridport.

Mr Cruse said he also partnered with UK company Odyssey Sensors to develop salinity sensors for small-scale shrimp farmers in Bangladesh, which he said doubled their crop yield and income over one year. 

Internet of Things Alliance chair Catherine Caruana-McManus said Launceston’s fibre-to-the-premises connection provided the perfect trial location for an IoT network in Tasmania. 

“It’s also about pairing urban environments so looking at how, for example food and produce is actually used in a city, so with this freight capability we move on to support it,” she said. 

Meshed founder Andrew Maggio said his Sydney-based company would partner with Mr Cruse in managing his networks through an integrated IoT service. 

BOFA in Action is leading Launceston’s push to become a smart city, but is asking the community to put their ideas forward as to how the city can benefit, including improving the health and education sectors.

To submit ideas head to Tasmania Made Open or contact the Launceston Chamber of Commerce president Donna Bain to get involved: donna@selfhelp.com.au

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