Film embraces body types

FILM FAN: Launceston-based accredited practising dietitian Georgia Rossetto hosted a screening of the body positive film Embrace. Picture: Paul Scambler

FILM FAN: Launceston-based accredited practising dietitian Georgia Rossetto hosted a screening of the body positive film Embrace. Picture: Paul Scambler

A local dietitian has shared a strong message with Tasmanian women by hosting a special screening of body positive documentary Embrace.

Georgia Rossetto was inspired to share the message in the film because it was something most women could relate to.

“This is a documentary made by an Adelaide mother of three who hated her body, tried to change it and realised she still didn’t like it when she had the perfect body,” Ms Rossetto said.

“She realised it had to be the way she was looking at her body that had to change and not her body.”

Taryn Brumfitt is that mother of three, who shot to fame when posted an unconventional before-and-after photograph online in 2013.

“She then went around talking to women around Australia and found that a lot of other women felt the same,” Ms Rossetto said.

A determination to find out why so many women do not embrace their bodies led Ms Brumfitt on a journey around the world, talking to leading experts on the issue.

“I think people can relate, being a mother of three she’s in a similar position to a lot of other women around Australia and I think she’s really approachable and highly identifiable,” Ms Rossetto said.

In the trailer for the film Ms Brumfitt said: “I don’t want my daughter to feel the same way so I am going to find some answers. 

“Why do so many people hate their bodies and what can we do about it?”

The film was launched at the start of August, and Ms Rossetto said there had been signifcant interest locally.

“I’m a local dietitian, so I talk to people about body image and work with bodies all the time and I thought it was a great message to get out there,” she said.

“I find a lot of people really struggle to make postive, healthy changes in their lives if they don’t accept and care for their body as it is now.

“A lot of people say to me ‘when I lose the weight then I will make healthy decisions, then I will be able to look after myself’ but what I find is that people have to accept themselves and start to care for themselves exactly as they are now for them to be able to make helpful changes.”

Ms Rossetto said when she talks to people about food, nutrition and diet she focuses on overall health, not just their weight.

“It’s quite different to what we focus on in society,” she said. “A lot of people feel that even if they’re healthy if they have got a bit of extra weight that they have to lose it, and that’s the message that is most important to me is focusing on health, not just what we look like.”

Tickets are still available for a screening on Wednesday, October 5 via the Launceston Dietetics Facebook.

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