Baby delivery a phonecall away

Amublance Tasmania communications officer Mark West with baby David Evans and parents Deanne Fraser and Tim Evans, of New Norfolk. Picture: GEORGIE BURGESS

Amublance Tasmania communications officer Mark West with baby David Evans and parents Deanne Fraser and Tim Evans, of New Norfolk. Picture: GEORGIE BURGESS

BABY David Evans was in rush to be born, but arrived safely thanks to the birth coaching of a triple-zero call-taker.

Ambulance Tasmania communications officer Mark West coached Deanne Fraser through the birth of her first son last week, when it became clear he was going to arrive before the paramedics.

The New Norfolk woman woke at 2am on Friday when her waters broke, and called an ambulance a short time later when her contractions were frequent.

Mr West took the call, and remained on the phone to Ms Fraser throughout David's birth.

Ms Fraser's partner Tim Evans raced down the street to get his sister, but by the time he returned the baby had been born.

''It was a bit scary,'' Ms Fraser said.

''I wasn't sure if everything was going to be OK with the baby and myself,'' she said.

Ms Fraser was all praise for Mr West.

''If it wasn't for him, I don't know how I would have handled it.''

''He gave me good words of advice to help me along, otherwise I don't reckon I would have been able to do it,'' she said.

Mr West said triple-zero call-takers often provide pre-arrival instructions, but it was rare to coach a woman through to birth.

''That little fellow clearly wasn't going to wait for anyone, so we just did what we had to do,'' Mr West said.

''I just said ''go with it'','' Mr West said.

Mr West has coached six births over the phone in his seven years in the radio room, but only two when the mother has been alone.

''I went home pretty chuffed,'' he said.

Ms Fraser and her newborn were taken to the Royal Hobart Hospital but were released later in the day.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop