Moments in time | Photos

THEY'VE got boxes of negatives, we’ve got terabytes of JPEGs and an Instagram feed.

And you can guarantee it won't stop - image making in whatever way and for whatever reason.  

Birthdays, Christmas, holidays and Friday and Saturday night. 

Be it the selfie, the family photo taken by embarrassing grandma or someone doing something stupid, intended for Facebook.

When our photographers were asked to choose an image for the Sunday Examiner, it started a discussion, the team showing off their incredible images over the last 30 years as press photographers.

These are images that people love, hate and wish never happened.  

The “best so far”, “something important to you” - it's a tricky thing to say to a photographer who is hungry for the next image, to get one better, never satisfied.

It’s addictive, it is a part of history, and it's so important.

As newspaper photographers it's a privilege to be capturing images daily, for everyone to see, no day is ever the same and often have no idea how your day will pan out.  

The year 2014 marks 175 years of photography worldwide.

Six of our Examiner photographers have compiled some of their landmark images from their careers.

Check out some more galleries at www.examiner.com.au and follow us on Instagram (@examineronline).

Brodie Weeding: Arcade Fire at this year's Big Day Out in Melbourne.

Brodie Weeding: Arcade Fire at this year's Big Day Out in Melbourne.

The Examiner's best-dressed photographer, Brodie Weeding.

The Examiner's best-dressed photographer, Brodie Weeding.

Brodie Weeding

Year I started taking photos: I picked up a camera for the first time in 2005 and picked up a camera for The Examiner in 2010.

First ever camera: A 6.1 megapixel beast called the Nikon D50. 

My favourite shot: Arcade Fire at Big Day Out 2014.

How I shot it: By joining about 20 other photographers and 26,000 music fans at this year’s Big Day Out in Melbourne. I was literally laying over the top of my fellow photographers with my camera held at arm's length as Win Butler (lead singer of Arcade Fire) jumped down into the crowd and was immediately surrounded by fans  and photographers alike.

Why it matters to me: Apart from the fact that I was standing less than a metre away from one of my favourite and the world’s biggest bands, unbeknown to me I was shooting my first and the very last Big Day Out festival.

I knew even before I looked at the camera screen that I had captured an amazing, once-in-a-lifetime moment and  it is something that I will never forget.

Geoff Robson: A wallaby crashed this photo of fire devastation at St Leonards.

Geoff Robson: A wallaby crashed this photo of fire devastation at St Leonards.

Geoff Robson

Year I started taking photos: 1995.

First ever camera: Nikon FM2.

My favourite image: Photo of a fire at St Leonards in November 1999.

How I shot it: I set up a shot of a fireman, and a little wallaby jumped into the frame.

Why it matters to me: This was my first page one photo. The lesson learned: you can set up a picture all you like but be prepared for something unexpected to happen and act quickly enough to take advantage of the fleeting moment. 

Mark Jesser: Damien Postregna looking through the ruins of his home after a tornado.

Mark Jesser: Damien Postregna looking through the ruins of his home after a tornado.

Mark Jesser caught on the job at Rowella.

Mark Jesser caught on the job at Rowella.

Mark Jesser

Year I started taking photos: 2008, aged 15.

First ever camera: Olympus Pocket Rocket (point and shoot).

My favourite image: The home of Damian Postregna in Mulwala, New South Wales, which was destroyed by a tornado in March 2013. 

How I shot it: This shot was not staged. Damian was very emotional at the time, walking through his house looking for personal belongings.

Why it matters to me: This picture was shot before I joined Fairfax Media, I was freelancing  at the time and I found out about the tornado via social media. Being midnight, I drove an hour, slept in my car and got up early. I started covering the devastation early in the morning before media arrived. The series of images started my career,I couldn’t wait to see it on the news the next morning.

Paul Scambler: Denny King at his Melaleuca home.

Paul Scambler: Denny King at his Melaleuca home.

Paul Scambler, right, with Sir Tony Robinson, who visited The Examiner earlier this year.

Paul Scambler, right, with Sir Tony Robinson, who visited The Examiner earlier this year.

Paul Scambler

Year I started taking photos: About the age of 10 with my father Len Scambler. I started at The Examiner in 1985, 29 years ago. 

First ever camera: Personal camera was a Exakta then a Pentax K1000. With The Examiner it was a Nikon FM2.

My favourite image: I photographed the late Denny King, AM (he died in May, 1991), at his house at Melaleuca, a remote hamlet in the south-west of Tasmania. His power was from batteries. He would also supply daily information about the weather.

How I shot it: This was taken with film on a Nikon F3 and 50mm lens.I couldn’t carry a tripod in, so this image was shot hand-held. I wanted him to be as natural as possible, and just relaxing in his lounge so I could capture his lounge room and all the things surrounding him, like his piano and books, using only natural light.

Why it matters to me: It was nice to meet a quiet and humble man, who lived very much off the land.

Scott Gelston: Glenn Todhunter, the first double amputee for the RFDS.

Scott Gelston: Glenn Todhunter, the first double amputee for the RFDS.

Serious snapper Scott Gelston.

Serious snapper Scott Gelston.

Scott Gelston

Year I started taking photos: 1993 (age 7). First published photo in 2004.

First ever camera: Haminex 110 film camera.

My favourite image: Glenn Todhunter, Launceston Airport, , July 2013.

How I shot it: I booked in the shoot for 8am when the morning light would be nice and planned to use a studio flash set-up to light Glenn. By shooting from a low angle it makes the subject look taller and strong as in ‘‘someone you’d look up to’’.

Why it matters to me: This image is one that works on many levels, the technicals of the camera all worked seamlessly, the prop, the plane, was already in the right place in relation to the light and Glenn made for an excellent subject. As the first double amputee for the Royal Flying Doctors' Service I wanted to ensure that Glenn’s portrait was a striking photo. It is also memorable for me as it ran on page one of The Sydney Morning Herald and The Examiner.

Neil Richardson: A fire aboard a power racing boat at the Devonport Regatta is extinguished.

Neil Richardson: A fire aboard a power racing boat at the Devonport Regatta is extinguished.

Snapper Neil Richardson began his photographic career in 1983.

Snapper Neil Richardson began his photographic career in 1983.

Neil Richardson

Year I started taking photosIn 1983 I started work as news photographer in Queensland.

First camera: Nikon FM2.

My favourite image: Capturing the moment a fire extinguisher was used to put out a fire on a power racing boat at the Devonport Regatta in 2012.

Not mentioned: The Examiner's daily snapper Phillip Biggs is on holiday leave.

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