Learning journey opens up new chapters

Sarah and Freya Pickrill, of George Town, celebrate in City Park. Picture: Geoff Robson

Sarah and Freya Pickrill, of George Town, celebrate in City Park. Picture: Geoff Robson

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DOCTOR Katrina de Graaf initially moved to Launceston from Brisbane to study sailing ship design at the Australian Maritime College.

Instead, she graduated yesterday with a PhD in engineering from the AMC.

Dr de Graaf said her research looked at the pressure field and bubble dynamics generated by seismic air-gun.

"I built a mini air-gun, so that was kind of cool. It's compressed air, you fire it underwater and it makes a big bang. I used high speed photography to look at bubble dynamics, and measure pressure field."

Dr de Graaf first graduated from the AMC in 2007, after completing an undergraduate degree in naval architecture.

She was one of 238 University of Tasmania and AMC students who attended yesterday's mid-year graduation ceremony at Launceston's Albert Hall.

A further 234 students graduated but did not attend the ceremony.

The students were spread across a range of areas including health, education, arts, AMC and the research college.

The university also presented an honorary degree to Dr Janis Cocking during the ceremony.

University vice-chancellor Peter Rathjen said Dr Cocking was awarded with a doctorate of engineering in recognition of her contributions to the university and to the state of Tasmania.

"Dr Cocking has played a substantial and active role in enhancing the interests, capabilities and international connections of the Australian Maritime College and the university," he said.

"Her high-level support has culminated in important, strategic outcomes including Commonwealth government support for major AMC facility upgrades and collaborative research projects."

Dr Cocking is the chief of the defence science and technology organisation maritime division.

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