Anti-protest bill dominates parliament

Premier Will Hodgman says the Tasmanian public endorsed the anti-protest legislation at the March state election

Premier Will Hodgman says the Tasmanian public endorsed the anti-protest legislation at the March state election

The government's anti-protest legislation this morning dominated question time, as state parliament resumed from the winter break.

MPs were greeted by about 200 protesters outside the doors of parliament house as they arrived.

Union members, lawyers, pensioners and environmentalists made a picket line to express opposition to the laws, which are before the Legislative Council.

Opposition Leader Bryan Green asked Resources Minister Paul Harriss whether he had received advice on the legislation from the Solicitor-General.

Mr Harriss said the legislation went through the ''proper and rigorous'' process, which was met with laughter from the opposition.

''You don't want to support workers,'' Mr Harriss said.

Despite lawyers warning the laws may be unconstitutional, the government stood by the legislation and said it was endorsed by the Tasmanian public at the state election in March.

The possible sale of the port at the Triabunna woodchip mill site to environmentalists Graeme Wood and Jan Cameron also sparked a fiery debate.

Infrastructure Minister Rene Hidding said he received the same briefing on the matter as former minister David O'Byrne.

The port can no longer be accessed since the sale of the site to Mr Wood and Ms Cameron.

Premier Will Hodgman said TasPorts made a commercial decision to negotiate the sale of the port.

Mr Hidding said he did not know how much the port would be sold for, and suggested Mr Green write to TasPorts to find out. 

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