Driver wants people to set in train safety

TasRail drivers Darrell Cooley and Craig Osborne hope the message will get through during National Rail Safety Week. Picture: NEIL RICHARDSON

TasRail drivers Darrell Cooley and Craig Osborne hope the message will get through during National Rail Safety Week. Picture: NEIL RICHARDSON

DARRELL Cooley has seen a lot in the 40 years he has been driving trains.

‘‘I’ve collided with cars, I’ve seen dead people – I’ve seen the horrific consequences of what can happen and I don’t want to see any of it again,’’ he said.

‘‘Is the time saved waiting for a train worth risking your life and ruining mine?’’

Yesterday marked the start of National Rail Safety Week.

Mr Cooley is worried the message is not getting through.

He said rail safety was an absolute priority for train drivers.

‘‘When there is a collision you do notice that for a few weeks afterwards people will stop, but then after a little while they’re back to ignoring the safety signals and they take the risk to go through the crossing,’’ he said.

TasRail chief executive Damien White said National Rail Safety Week was a chance for the community to reflect on how it interacted with the railway.

He said it was not only about vehicular safety but incidents like children playing on railway bridges, throwing things at passing trains or placing items on tracks.

‘‘Most people want to do the right thing, but others appear to deliberately flout the law,’’ Mr White said.

‘‘Either they are unaware of the risk they are taking or they believe they are invincible and have little regard for how their actions can impact others.’’

Mr Cooley agreed.

‘‘If I hit a car or person it is the worst feeling in the world, but I’ll be powerless to stop it from happening.’’

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