Cricket coaches pitch in

THE state’s cricket coaching community assembled in Launceston yesterday for the first day of Cricket Tasmania’s coaching seminar at Riverside’s Windsor Park.

Cricket Tasmania coaching education and development manager Tim Coyle, Cricket Australia spin consultant John Davison and South Launceston cricketer Alec Smith at yesterday’s coaching seminar.  Picture: MARK JESSER

Cricket Tasmania coaching education and development manager Tim Coyle, Cricket Australia spin consultant John Davison and South Launceston cricketer Alec Smith at yesterday’s coaching seminar. Picture: MARK JESSER

The seminar, which featured both skill and theory-based elements, involved coaches from every senior cricket club in the state, as well as those from the independent schools’ program, learning from experts from both the sport’s national and state governing bodies.

It was organised by former Tasmanian Sheffield Shield-winning coach Tim Coyle in his role as Cricket Tasmania’s coaching education and development manager, and is a rare opportunity for coaches from the three regions to get together in the one location.

‘‘This is a very important weekend, particularly with the knowledge that the game is always changing and can change quite quickly,’’ Coyle said.

‘‘As much as we run really good coaching accreditation courses, one of the real great needs is to make sure we can get our working coaches back into this sort of environment, give them some new information and tools to use out on the field.

‘‘It is paramount to making sure we have a strong coaching community.’’

State under-age representative players also attended to help with the practical side of things.

Among those presenting were Tasmanian coach Dan Marsh and his assistant and Hobart Hurricanes boss Damien Wright.

Fellow former Tigers and Cricket Tasmania coaching staff members Adam Griffith (bowling) and Rhett Lockyear (batting) and Tassie Roar coach Julia Price also attended.

Cricket Australia coaches were also on hand, with national spin consultant John Davison, who has worked closely with incumbent Test off-spinner Nathan Lyon, passing on his knowledge of the art of slow bowling, with Andy Utting focusing on fielding and throwing.

‘‘Spin bowling is looked upon as a bit of a dark art and spinners are generally in a minority with not a lot focus put on them, so to get out and give tips to the coaches so they are not afraid to help their spinners is very important,’’ Davison said.

‘‘From a coaching point of view, if someone is spinning the ball and looking effective, I tell them to go and develop, and if they don’t see that effectiveness, there are a couple of basic techniques we can teach them.’’

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