Mill company sets the record straight on site

Jan Cameron

Jan Cameron

THE company owned by environmentalists Graeme Wood and Jan Cameron has spoken out against the state government's move to launch a parliamentary inquiry into the closure, sale and dismantling of Triabunna mill.

Parliamentary Secretary Guy Barnett announced the inquiry this week, after a magazine article detailed the mill's undercover demolition by general manager Alec Marr.

Mr Barnett had said the article exposed the "disgraceful tactics of radical environmentalists", and questions still remained over the former government's knowledge of the new owners' intentions.

But a statement released by Triabunna Investments, owned by Ms Cameron and Mr Wood, said an inquiry would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, and risk scaring off investment in the state.

It said the company wanted to "put on the record key facts" to provide context for the mill's dismantlement, including:

  • •The mill was maintained in working condition for two years and put to tender, but no economically viable tender was received.
  • •The company was legally required to begin decommissioning and rehabilitating the site if woodchipping had ceased for two years.
  • •In July 2013, after two years, a decommissioning and rehabilitation plan was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency. It was accepted three months later.

"All our staff acted in a lawful and professional manner in the decommissioning process and they have gone out of their way to work with the local community to plan a future for the site," the statement said.

It said detailed planning for the site was under way, with contracts already arranged for professional services.

"We want Spring Bay Mill transformed from a defunct mill to an international tourism venture that will put this wonderful state on the international map," the statement said.

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