Using Facebook wisely could help score a job

DIRT Art director Simon French said his company relied on Facebook to alert people to vacant positions.

He said the Tasmanian-based business, which builds mountain bike tracks nationally, often needed casual workers throughout the country.

``It's cheap and easy for us but more than anything it targets mountain bike riders, who are quite often fairly active on social media,'' Mr French said.

``It tends to go fairly viral because people are good with sharing the bits and pieces we put up.''

Mr French advised people responding to job ads on social media to treat it as seriously as they would any other advertisement.

He encouraged people to check their spelling and presentation and follow up the response with a phone call.

``If people take it seriously, we tend to take them seriously,'' he said.

``Put effort in, it shows a real commitment, and show a bit of an interest.''

Mr French also reminded people their personal profile was only one click away.

``We don't snoop, but if there's something glaring on there it can be a bit off-putting,'' he said.

He listed anti-social behaviour and people appearing persistently drunk and disorderly as issues.

Simon French, the director of Tasmanian-based mountain bike track building business Dirt Art, uses Facebook to advertise jobs. He advised people responding to treat it as seriously as they would any other advertisement. Picture: SCOTT GELSTON

Simon French, the director of Tasmanian-based mountain bike track building business Dirt Art, uses Facebook to advertise jobs. He advised people responding to treat it as seriously as they would any other advertisement. Picture: SCOTT GELSTON

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