Pumphouse gets five-star treatment | PHOTOS, VIDEOS

Pumphouse Point, on Lake St Clair. Construction inside the 1940s hydro-electric pumphouse began last month, with 12 suites to be built into the prominent art deco building. Pictures: MARK JESSER

Pumphouse Point, on Lake St Clair. Construction inside the 1940s hydro-electric pumphouse began last month, with 12 suites to be built into the prominent art deco building. Pictures: MARK JESSER

AFFORDABILITY was a major marketing concern for tourism entrepreneur Simon Currant in his latest development, Pumphouse Point, situated in the state's Central Highlands.

Construction inside the 1940s hydro-electric pumphouse began last month, with 12 suites over three levels to be built into the prominent art deco building, and a further six suites located in the nearby lake house.

A night spent  inside a piece of Tasmania's hydro history will cost between $280 and $480.

The unique hotel that sits inside the Lake St Clair National Park and World Heritage area will become available to tourists just as Chinese interest in Tasmania as a holiday destination soars.

Latest Tourism Tasmania statistics reveal a record 18,900 Chinese tourists visited the state during the last recording period to March, with a 14 per cent increase in overall visitors, surpassing one million.

Mr Currant said international markets had already shown interest in Pumphouse Point.

``The majority of our market are experience seekers, people who want a soft adventure,'' Mr Currant said.

``This is unique. It is an extraordinary thing to be staying in buildings like this, out in this environment.

``There is nothing else in the world that I have found like it.'' 

Guests will be flown to Pumphouse Point by seaplane and offered a range of natural experiences, including hiking, mountain biking and fishing.

It could also become a final destination for walkers finishing the iconic Overland Track.

Tasmanian Air Adventures said its planes could fly from the Tamar River out of Launceston to the Central Highlands if there was a demand.

Cumulus Studio architect Peter Walker said there were numerous positives about Pumphouse Point.

``It is in a World Heritage site, is 250 metres out on the lake, there is an industrial story which is really a Tasmanian story about Hydro and the development of the Central Highlands,'' Mr Walker said. ``It is incredible.''

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