Year 10 students get on creative pathway

Grade 10 students Sean Arnol, of Brooks High School, Lili Bennett, of Campbell Town High, Mitchell French, of Riverside High, Jaxon Stickler, of Exeter High, Elliot Ritchie, of City Campus, and Eden Dawson, of Port Dalrymple, are taking part in a cultural and sports tourism pilot program at the University of Tasmania.

Grade 10 students Sean Arnol, of Brooks High School, Lili Bennett, of Campbell Town High, Mitchell French, of Riverside High, Jaxon Stickler, of Exeter High, Elliot Ritchie, of City Campus, and Eden Dawson, of Port Dalrymple, are taking part in a cultural and sports tourism pilot program at the University of Tasmania.

ABOUT 50 Northern Tasmanian high school students are this month finding out what a job in Tasmania's arts culture tourism industry would be like.

The year 10 students from Riverside, Exeter, Port Dalrymple, Campbell Town, Brooks and City Campus are all participating in the University of Tasmania's pilot education project Lighting the Pathways.

Yesterday, the students received materials, which they have three days to use to create their own artwork to be installed at Aurora Stadium for Hawthorn's next Launceston match on June 28.

Centre for University Pathways and Partnerships pro vice-chancellor Sue Kilpatrick said the project was a good way for the students to develop an understanding of the industry.

"The project is aimed at introducing young people - and in fact people already in the workforce - to professional jobs in the future in four industry areas," Professor Kilpatrick said.

"The idea of the project is to say to the young people that this is what the industry is like and this is what the jobs might be like.

"There are actually possibilities now, particularly in Tasmania, where creative arts is associated with tourism, so people can get jobs not just making art but in events management."

The students will market the exhibition using social media and hear from several tourism industry representatives.

Brooks High School's Sean Arnold said it was "a great way to show the skills high school students can actually have".

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