Taxidermy marches out of the past at fair

Latrobe antiques dealer Kevin Dahya sees no evil, hears no evil and speaks no evil with the help of three preserved possums at the Tasmanian Antiques Fair in Launceston yesterday. Picture: MARK JESSER

Latrobe antiques dealer Kevin Dahya sees no evil, hears no evil and speaks no evil with the help of three preserved possums at the Tasmanian Antiques Fair in Launceston yesterday. Picture: MARK JESSER

TAXIDERMY is making a comeback and that is a good thing, says one antique dealer at the Tasmanian Antiques Fair.

Grange Antiques dealer Kevin Dahya, of Latrobe, has a range of old and new preserved animals on show at the fair in Launceston's Albert Hall.

Today marks the final day of the four-day fair, with the doors open from 10am to 4pm.

Organisers have been pleased with the numbers, with Saturday's AFL game boosting the crowd.

Mr Dahya said his antique taxidermy pieces came from an era when some houses would have a room full of animal heads on the wall.

He said taxidermy was making a comeback and the idea now was to make it a piece of art.

The pieces could be cute or humorous and young people might create a setting with grass and flowers to enhance the work.

He said the premise behind taxidermy had changed - a century ago animals were killed to be trophies.

Mr Dahya said he was in the process of having his two-year-old pet dog, which was shot dead, preserved.

"It is all about getting the animal to look alive again," he said.

"You have to capture its spirit."

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop