Get set with online Ten training

Kym Goodes, of East Launceston. Picture: PHILLIP BIGGS

Kym Goodes, of East Launceston. Picture: PHILLIP BIGGS

KYM Goodes is entering the Launceston Ten with a specific goal.

"I'm hoping to finish under 60minutes," Ms Goodes, of East Launceston, said.

"I've done quite a few 10kilometres and I've never been able to break 60 minutes.

"I'm turning 50 in July, so my goal is to make sure I break it before my 50th birthday."

To help her achieve the goal and smash the one-hour barrier, Ms Goodes has turned to a conditioning coach, whom she trains with three to five times a week.

"I'm just trying to make sure that I'm fit all over, not just fit in my running," she said.

"I really love the mental challenge of running.

"My work's quite challenging mentally, I'm pretty full-on during the day and I just find that running is like another way of challenging myself and staying physically and mentally strong.

"For me it's about balance in my life."

In the lead-up to the Launceston Ten on June 15, The Examiner is running an eight- week online training program with personal trainer Kate Pedley.

Each Monday, The Examiner will upload that week's training schedule to examiner.com.au, as well as profile a Launceston Ten entrant.

For more information or to register for the event, visit www.launcestonten.com.au.

Week Four Top 10 Tips – Mental Training

As the weather gets colder, it can be harder to get our minds into gear than our bodies.  Just as we work out our bodies, we also need to exercise our minds. Positive mental training is the key.

A famous quote from George S. Patton, U.S. Army General and 1912 Olympian, “Now if you are going to win any battle you have to do one thing.  You have to make the mind run the body.  Never let the body tell the mind what to do.  The body will always give up.  It is always tired morning, noon, and night.  But the body is never tired if the mind is not tired.  When you were younger the mind could make you dance all night, and the body was never tired.  You've always got to make the mind take over and keep going."
         

While thinking about running won't get you in shape, creative visualizations will motivate you to stick with a training plan, achieve your running goals and persevere in challenging race conditions.

Mental training is a powerful tool whether you're a beginner or an elite. Visualizing does not mean daydreaming about being a great runner, it is establishing a self-fulfilling prophecy of achieving.  It is a learned skill that requires discipline and regular practice, but all you need is your imagination. You can use visualization to attack any problem or achieve any goal. Imagery can be used for reducing stress, gaining energy, focusing attention or managing pain during a race.

1. Breathing

Begin with a few minutes of deep abdominal breathing. Put one hand on your stomach and feel it rise and fall with each breath. Imagine that when you inhale you are filling up a balloon. As you exhale, the balloon collapses.

2. Visualisation

Create a vivid image in your mind of what you want to achieve.  See yourself crossing that finish line. What is the time on the clock?  How do you feel?  Can you hear the cheering spectators?  Let negative thoughts disappear as you focus on your success image.

3. Positive Picturing

Don't replay bad runs in your mind. You want to remove all negative memories.  We all have bad days and training sessions when your legs are full of sand and you just can’t find a rhythm.  Move on – tomorrow is another day, and you will be delighted to find how much you have improved.  Mentally edit memories of poor sessions and replay the memories of those days when you run happy and feel on top of the world!

4. Build a bank of positive memories

Each time you are energized by an experience or motivated by a performance, anchor the memory in your mind so that you'll be able to recall that vision whenever you need it. When you revisit positive memories on a regular basis, you can bring to mind empowering thoughts that will inspire your running and recharge your life.

5. Positive self-talk

Learn to control the internal conversation that runs through your mind. For example, when running, you might tell yourself that you are tired and have to stop. If this is the case, then the self-fulfilling prophecy will work and you will feel that you really do have to stop. Positive self-talk, on the other hand, can contribute to higher performance. Train your mind to say things like "I'm feeling really good today" or "this isn't really that hard" keeping the internal conversation positive and energising you.  Self compliments can be useful for overcoming tough patches in races or workouts.  Tell yourself things like: "I'm faster to this point than I was last week" or "I've never felt this good running before."  

6. Have a race plan.

This is vital.  I like to break a race into thirds.  During first third concentrate on perfect running form and run exactly to the speed you have pre-determined is right for you.  A major mistake is to go out too fast.  By the time you are into the second third, you will be warm and feeling good.  This is when you can increase your pace and really run your race.  The last third you will run with your heart and mind – give it everything you have left. Treat each third as a separate race.

7. Magnet visualiser

When you are running and getting tired, imagine that the runner ahead of you has a magnet on her back. Rather than working hard to catch up, envision being effortlessly drawn to your team-mate or competitor by the magnet's force. Once you pull alongside her, place the magnet on the back of the next runner ahead of you. Using the magnet image allows you to take your mind off your fatigue, sustain your concentration and have a bit of fun.

8. Elastic form

Visualizations can help you improve your form as well. Imagine there is a rubber band in the small of your back that gently pulls you back.  Another rubber band attached to your heart pulls you gently forward.  Imagine keeping your body tall and perfectly positioned between these two bands.  This works particularly well on hills, with your heart band pulling you up the hill and your back band keeping you straight when running down.

9. Just Get Up!

Don’t think when that alarm goes off in the morning. Have your gear ready to pull on (perhaps in a warm place!)  Get out of bed instantly, get dressed and get out of the door before your mind has a chance to butt in.

10. Magic mantras

Find six different mantras that you can repeat to yourself when you need motivating.  Next week we will feature ten mantras to energise the toughest workout!

Launceston Ten Training Program

DISCLAIMER:  Undertaking any of these programs is at your own risk.  Should you have any health care related questions, please call or see your physician or other qualified health care provider promptly. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.

Week Four –  Program One.    Get me to the finish line!

Notes:  This is a walk run program, designed to see you finish the Launceston Ten injury free. Technology has conditioned us to expect results now.  Your body doesn't work that way. Don't try to do more, even if you feel you can. If, on the other hand, you find the program too strenuous, just stretch it out. Don't feel pressured to continue faster than you're able. Repeat weeks if needed and move ahead only when you feel you're ready.  Always run easy at a pace comfortable enough for you to chat to your running partner.

Monday

5 min walk.  Stretch (see training tips below).  15 minutes run.  Finish with 5 minutes walking cool down.  Stretch.

Tuesday

Cross Training 45 - 60 mins (see cross training notes below).  

Wednesday

5 min walk.  Stretch (see training tips below).  15 minutes run.  Finish with 5 minutes walking cool down.  Stretch.

Thursday

Rest Day (training notes below).  

Friday

Cross Training 45 - 60

Saturday

5 min walk.  Stretch (see training tips below).  15 minutes run.  Finish with 5 minutes walking cool down.  Stretch.

Sunday

Rest Day (Grab a relaxing massage or a soak in a tub with bath salts)

Week Four – Program 2.  Break The Hour!

Notes:  To break the hour you will need to be running 6 minute kilometres by the end of the nine weeks.  Be sure to achieve this pace slowly in order to finish the Launceston Ten injury free. Technology has conditioned us to expect results now.  Your body doesn't work that way. Don't try to do more, even if you feel you can. If, on the other hand, you find the program too strenuous, just stretch it out. Don't feel pressured to continue faster than you're able. Repeat weeks if needed and move ahead only when you feel you're ready.   Always run easy at a pace comfortable enough for you to chat to your running partner.  Effort sessions come later!

Monday

10 min walk/ jog warm up.  Stretch (see training tips below).  30 - 45 min run at a consistent comfortable pace.   Finish with 5 mins walking cool down.  Stretch.

Tuesday

Cross Training 45 - 60 mins. (see training tips below)

Wednesday

15 min walk/jog warm up.  Stretch. 5 sets of 3 minute  (make sets 2 and 4 faster – go to 80%) effort runs with 90 seconds recovery. Finish with 5 mins walking cool down.  Stretch.

Thursday

Rest day (see training tips below)

Friday

Cross training 45 - 60 mins

Saturday

10 min walk/jog  warm up.  Stretch.  40 – 45 min run at a consistent comfortable pace.   Finish with 5 mins walking cool down.  Stretch.

Sunday

Rest Day (Grab a relaxing massage or a soak in a tub with bath salts)

Week Four – Program Three.  Go for it! (break 45 mins)

Notes:  This program is only suitable for experienced runners who already have a sound level of running fitness.  To begin, you will need to be able to run sub 4minute kms.  Weights are an excellent cross training choice.   Recovery means stop and walk to allow your heart and muscles to recover before the next effort.

Monday

20 min warm up.  10 x 1min effort 75% with 1 min recovery. Cool down and stretch

Tuesday

5 minute warm up. Stretch. 6km run at just out of comfort level.  Strength training. Cool down and stretch

Wednesday

15 min warm up, hill session (8x1 minute). 15 min cool down and stretch.

Thursday

Cross Training

Friday

Rest day

Saturday

20 min warm up, 30 min tempo run, cool down and stretch

Sunday

12 km run at easy pace

Program training tips.  Not matter which program you are following, always apply these training tips:

Cross Train

Cross training refers to other wonderful exercises that become an important part of your program. This includes swimming, bike-riding, hiking, Pilates, Yoga, walking the dog. The beauty of cross training is that it helps increasing your fitness level while giving your running-muscles a break.

Always Warm up and cool down

As our days become cooler, it is vital to warm up and cool down.  Warming up is an excellent way to send your body a clear message that you’re about to become physically active. This way, your heart and legs could adjust properly. To warn up, start with a brisk walk followed by easy running for couple of minutes or so.  Then enjoy a few gentle stretches (never stretch cold muscles) and begin your program.  

When you finish your running, take a few of minutes to cool down by running very slowly and walking in the last minutes of your workout. Finish with a stretch.

Maintaining warm-ups and cool downs greatly helps in reducing muscle pains which, in turn, improves your overall recovery process.

Always Stretch.

Many runners keep seeing the same running injuries popping up, and they are usually avoidable.  Excess tightness in certain running muscles, the glutes especially, leads to the body to move in inefficient patterns, and injuries can often happen as a result of this compensation.  Find one stretch each that you love for your hamstrings, quads, claves, glutes and back.   Never stretch or hold to the point of pain.  Stretches should make your muscles are loose and your body able to function the way it was meant to when you run.

Hydrate. Hydrate. Hydrate!

An easy trap to fall into in cool conditions is to forget to hydrate. Even in cold weather we use water to sweat, lubricate joints, tendons, and ligaments, and to carry blood efficiently to major organs. Dehydration causes your blood volume to drop, which lowers your body's ability to transfer heat and forces your heart to beat faster, making it difficult for your body to meet aerobic demands.  Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink. Drink early and often--every day.

Take your rest days seriously.

If you don't take time for proper R&R, your body won't adapt to the stress of your training—you won't get stronger or faster. Neglect recovery, and you will start to lose strength and speed. It is so easy to get carried away with the wonderful feeling of your new fitness – but if you don’t rest you will sink into the awful black hole known as overtraining.

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