Enjoying 150 years of trout in Tasmania

THE 150th anniversary of trout arriving in Tasmania was yesterday celebrated at the Australian Fly Fishing Museum at Clarendon, near Evandale.

Museum volunteer co-ordinator Brad Gawne was on hand to explain the trout story to its visitors.

He said trout had a strong connection with Clarendon and Tasmanian trout were the basis of fisheries in other states and New Zealand.

Mr Gawne said although yesterday was the 150th anniversary of trout arriving in the state from England, fly-fishing had a much longer story.

Ancient sources credit a man in Macedonia using a form of fly-fishing to catch a fish 2000 years ago and then more than 400 years ago a person in Japan used a bamboo pole, silk line and silkworm bait to catch fish.

Mr Gawne said the museum used storyboards, equipment displays and talks to explain fly-fishing.

Trout is just one aspect of many events and venues included in this year's Tasmanian Heritage Festival.

National Trust events and special promotions manager Hilary Keeley said the history group had been ``thinking outside the square'' to come up with fun, family friendly events.

On May 24, dinner event A Conversation with Josef Chromy will tell the story of the successful Northern entrepreneur.

Clarendon will host a classic car display on May 25, with a funny and inspiring discussion, Chicks with Grit and a Token Bloke in Launceston the night before.

There will also be debates on immigration, Bass Strait transport, and artist Mandy Hunniford will give insights on her work.

Australian Fly Fishing Museum volunteer co-ordinator Brad Gawne with a collection of lures. Picture: NEIL RICHARDSON

Australian Fly Fishing Museum volunteer co-ordinator Brad Gawne with a collection of lures. Picture: NEIL RICHARDSON

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