The B&E Launceston Ten – You CAN do it!

The first step is the longest stride. Commit to the right training program for you and you will be lining up at the start line on Sunday 15 June with confidence that you will not only finish this 10 km event, but you will love the experience.

This is a unique race with unique conditions. It is set in the coldest state of Australia in winter, so you need to learn to train in the dark and perform in the cold. We have put together a 9 week training program that will help you achieve all of this.

Launceston athlete, Kate Pedley, knows all about training in our unique conditions. Kate has a long history of competition at all distances, from representing Australia in the 400m event a the World Junior Championships in Jamaica to running the Launceston Ten last year in under 35 minutes. Kate has partnered with us to bring you this training program, customized to Launceston conditions. Whether you just want to get to the finish line or run sub 45 minutes, these three programs will help you achieve your Launceston Ten goal.

Every week, The Examiner will include local tips and information, to keep you training through winter. We will also profile a local runner every week, to keep you motivated.

Week One Top 10 Tips

Sometime life seems to get pretty complicated.  Running, which was so simple when we were kids, suddenly seems like rocket science.  Every week we will post ten new tips to help you walk, run and enjoy the Launceston Ten.

1. Check with your doctor

New runners should always check with a doctor before starting a training program, especially under the following conditions: breathing problems, overweight, heart problems, chronic fatigue, above forty, and if you have no running background whatsoever. We want you to love the experience of your 10km run, so better safe than sorry!

2. Start slow

The most common major mistake is made with the very first steps: doing too much too soon.  There's no joy in running if you can't run, so don't get injured.  You must incorporate walking into your running routine especially if you’re an absolute beginner. Stick to your chosen training schedule and plan to finish injury free everyday.  You need to send a message through training that it needs to grow a little stronger.  As your fitness increases you will be tempted to make fast progress and overtrain.  It's easy to get impatient, and you may feel tempted to skip ahead in the program, but hold yourself back. A rule of thumb is not to add more than 10% distance to any run or to your overall weekly mileage.

3. Get the right gear.

Essentially you can run in pyjamas if you want to. However, there is one requirement that is not negotiable, and that is the right shoes. Training to complete 10 km is going to make your feet and legs work hard. Remember, 10km run will see your feet hitting the ground close to 10,000 times!  So you need a qualified person to fit you with the perfect shoes. Do I hear you say you can’t afford it? Badly fitting, or worn out shoes can result in expensive doctor or physio bills, so good shoes really are a sound investment.

4. Cross train

Cross training refers to other wonderful exercises that become an important part of your program. This includes swimming, bike-riding, hiking, Pilates, Yoga, walking the dog. The beauty of cross training is that it helps increasing your fitness level while giving your running-muscles a break.

5. Warm up and cool down

As our days become cooler, it is vital to warm up and cool down. Warming up is an excellent way to send your body a clear message that you’re about to become physically active. This way, your heart and legs can adjust properly. To warn up, start with a brisk walk followed by easy running for couple of minutes or so. Then enjoy a few gentle stretches (never stretch cold muscles) and begin your program.

When you finish your running, take a few of minutes to cool down by running very slowly and walking in the last minutes of your workout. Finish with a stretch.

Maintaining warm-ups and cool downs greatly helps in reducing muscle pains which, in turn, improves your overall recovery process.

6. Stretch.

Many runners keep seeing the same running injuries popping up, and they are usually avoidable.  Excess tightness in certain running muscles, the glutes especially, causes the body to move in inefficient patterns, and injuries can often happen as a result of this compensation. Find one stretch each that you love for your hamstrings, quads, calves, glutes and back. Never stretch or hold to the point of pain. Stretches should make your muscles are loose and your body able to function the way it was meant to when you run.

7. Hydrate. Hydrate. Hydrate!

An easy trap to fall into in cool conditions is to forget to hydrate. Even in cold weather we use water to sweat, lubricate joints, tendons, and ligaments, and to carry blood efficiently to major organs. Dehydration causes your blood volume to drop, which lowers your body's ability to transfer heat and forces your heart to beat faster, making it difficult for your body to meet aerobic demands. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink. Drink early and often--every day.

8. Take your rest days seriously.

If you don't take time for proper R&R, your body won't adapt to the stress of your training—you won't get stronger or faster. Neglect recovery, and you will start to lose strength and speed. It is so easy to get carried away with the wonderful feeling of your new fitness – but if you don’t rest you will sink into the awful black hole known as overtraining.

9. Stay safe.

In a city like Launceston, it is easy to become relaxed about traffic. Do not ever let this be the case. Always run against the traffic. It's easier to avoid cars if you can see them coming. Avoid busy roads and those with no shoulders or footpaths or that are poorly lit.

If you're running in the early morning or at night, even at dusk, wear white, yellow, or orange clothes. Also, make sure you have reflective gear on. Although some items (running shoes, jackets) already have reflective pieces on them, it doesn't hurt to add more. A headlamp is also a great item for runners who do a lot of early morning or evening runs.

Run with a buddy. There's strength and safety in numbers. Don’t always run the same route or time. Potential attackers can study runners' routines and loom in a particularly dark or isolated area. Don't make yourself an easy target. 

10. Enjoy it!

There is so much to love about running.  Create the conditions that result in running bringing more happiness to your life.  Explore new routes, run with music, run with friends.  Make it personal.  

DISCLAIMER: Undertaking any of these programs is at your own risk. Should you have any health care related questions, please call or see your physician or other qualified health care provider promptly. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.

Week One – Program One. Get me to the finish line!

Notes: This is a walk/run program, designed to see you finish the Launceston Ten injury free. Technology has conditioned us to expect results now.  Your body doesn't work that way. Don't try to do more, even if you feel you can. If, on the other hand, you find the program too strenuous, just stretch it out. Don't feel pressured to continue faster than you're able. Repeat weeks if needed and move ahead only when you feel you're ready.

Always run easy at a pace comfortable enough for you to chat to your running partner.

Monday

Five minute walk. Stretch (see this week’s tips). 10 minutes of 30 sec run and 30 seconds walk. Finish with five minutes walking cool down. Stretch.

Tuesday

Cross training 45 - 60 minutes (see this week’s tips).

Wednesday

Five minute walk. Ten minutes of 30 second run and 30 second walk. Finish with five minutes walking cool down. Stretch.

Thursday

Rest Day (see this week’s tips).

Friday

Cross training 45 - 60 mins (see this week’s tips).

Saturday

Five minute walk. Stretch. 10 minutes of 30 second run and 30 second walk. Finish with five minutes walking cool down. Stretch.

Sunday

Rest Day (Grab a relaxing massage)

Week One – Program Two. Break The Hour!

Notes: To break the hour you will need to be running 6 minute kilometres by the end of the nine weeks. Be sure to achieve this pace slowly in order to finish the Launceston Ten injury free. Technology has conditioned us to expect results now.  Your body doesn't work that way. Don't try to do more, even if you feel you can. If, on the other hand, you find the program too strenuous, just stretch it out. Don't feel pressured to continue faster than you're able. Repeat weeks if needed and move ahead only when you feel you're ready.

Always run easy at a pace comfortable enough for you to chat to your running partner. Effort sessions come later!

Monday

10 min walk/slow jog warm up. Stretch (see this week’s tips). 30 min run at a consistent comfortable pace. Finish with 5 mins walking cool down. Stretch.

Tuesday

Cross Training 45 - 60 mins. (see this week’s tips)

Wednesday

10 min walk/slow jog warm up. Stretch (see this week’s tips). 35 min run at a consistent comfortable pace. Finish with 5 mins walking cool down. Stretch.

Thursday

Cross training 45 - 60 mins

Friday

Rest day (see this week’s tips)

Saturday

10 min walk/slow jog warm up. Stretch (see this week’s tips). 30 min run at a consistent comfortable pace. Finish with 5 mins walking cool down. Stretch.

Sunday

Rest Day (Grab a relaxing massage)

Week One – Program Three. Race to Win (or at least break 45 mins)

Notes: This program is only suitable for experienced runners who already have a sound level of running fitness. To begin, you will need to be able to run sub 4 minute kms. Weights are an excellent cross training choice. Recovery means stop and walk to allow your heart and muscles to recover before the next effort.

Monday

20 min warm up. 8x1min effort 75% with 1 min recovery. Cool down and stretch

Tuesday

5 minute warm up. Stretch. 5km run at just out of comfort level. Cool down and stretch

Wednesday

15 min warm up, hill session (8x45 secs) 15 min cool down and stretch.

Thursday

Cross Training

Friday

Rest day

Saturday

20 min warm up, 30 min tempo run, cool down and stretch

Sunday

10 km run at easy pace

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