Government warned it must be ready

TASMANIA'S endangered climate council has warned the Liberal government it must be ready for the economic opportunities climate change will bring to the state.

The Climate Action Council is awaiting the chop, as per the Liberals' pre-election promise in September, and new Energy Minister Matthew Groom said yesterday it would be axed "in due course".

The council was formed in 2009 to provide independent expert advice on Tasmania's response to climate change.

Deputy chairwoman Jess Feehley said the council had brought together a number of experts to identify climate change priority areas for Tasmania, including renewable energy, agriculture and population growth.

"Tasmania really does have the capacity to be 100 per cent renewable [in energy production and use], decreasing emissions and increasing energy security on the island," she said.

This would also attract industries looking to reduce its emissions, and those after a "green badge" for sustainability, she said.

"Tasmania really does have the capacity to be 100 per cent renewable [in energy production and use], decreasing emissions and increasing energy security on the island," - Jess Feehley

Population growth from "climate refugees" from the mainland would also need to be considered in terms of urban planning and infrastructure such as hospitals, schools and public transport.

And the agriculture industry needed to make some "smart decisions" about diversity of crops, growing techniques, and water management through irrigation, Ms Feehley said.

"They're already doing a lot of good work to assist in these strategies," she said.

TFGA chief executive Jan Davis said the state's farmers were well placed to adapt to any temperature increases, saying some crops may be able to be grown more widely across the state thanks in part to new irrigation schemes, as well as warming conditions.

"We might have to grow some different things ... but on a domestic and international scale, we're already doing that stuff," she said.

"Farmers are very adaptable ... It's really about an awareness and an understanding of the need for flexibility."

Mr Groom said there was significant expertise in climate change and renewable energy issues within government.

"One of the most significant and practical contributions Tasmania can make in responding to climate change is to maximise the clean, renewable energy we deliver into the national market," he said.

"We remain committed to pursuing further renewable development opportunity including advancing the case for a second Bass Strait interconnector."

Temperatures across the state are projected to increase by about 2.9 Celsius by the end of the century, under a high greenhouse gas emissions scenario.

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