Greens confident of resurgence

GREENS leader Nick McKim said there were difficult days ahead for the party after suffering an 8 per cent swing against it in the state election.

Mr McKim and Denison MHA Cassy O'Connor are guaranteed to hold their seats, but the minor party has lost at least two incumbents and Kim Booth is clinging on in Bass.

``We've been here before and we do come back bigger and better and stronger than ever,'' Mr McKim said.

Political analyst Kate Crowley said several key factors had hurt the Greens' election campaign, including their alignment with an unpopular Labor Party in 2010 and the decline of the forestry industry.

``The Greens do better when there's a catalysing issue that captures people's attention in the run-up to an election,'' she said.

``The pulp mill wasn't a catalysing issue in the lead-up to this election. Forestry was more of a catalysing issue, but a negative one for the Greens.''

Mr McKim said the party respected the verdict of Tasmanian voters.

``It's important to respect the will of a democracy and Tasmanians have clearly voted for change, clearly voted for a Liberal majority government,'' he said.

Saturday's emphatic Liberal victory pointed to a ``conservative tide'' sweeping Australia, the Greens leader said.

``Tides come in, tides go out, but the Greens are here to stay: there is no doubt about that,'' he said.

``We will be a strong voice for vulnerable and marginalised people, we will be a strong voice for our climate and we will be a strong voice in defence of Tasmania's wildlife.''

Mr McKim said he believed his leadership was secure, but the matter would ultimately be decided in the party room.

``I will be putting my hand up after we  have the declaration of the polls because I do believe I am the best person to lead the Greens in Tasmania,'' he said.

Mr McKim said the fate of all Greens candidates could not be certain until preferences were distributed under the Hare-Clark system.

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