Greens aim for Liberal vote switch

THE Greens will target soft Liberals and disillusioned Labor voters in their mission to take on more power in the next government. 

At the party's official campaign launch, Greens leader Nick McKim made a direct pitch to ``traditionally conservative'' Liberals, saying the Greens were the only party that supported free enterprise and would not interfere in people's private lives - a reference to same-sex marriage. 

``A vote for Will Hodgman is a vote for Eric Abetz and Tony Abbott,'' Mr McKim said. 

The Greens will this week distribute pamphlets heavily featuring the Liberals' traditional colour, blue, and urging voters to ask themselves: ``Which party stands for real Liberal values?''.

The pamphlets will be handed out mainly in Denison, where the party believes it can win a second seat, but will also be distributed in some parts of Bass, held by Kim Booth. 

Mr McKim also appealed to disillusioned Labor voters. 

``Labor's a shambles and is racked by internal division.''

About 100 party faithful gathered in Hobart for the launch hosted by former Australian Greens leader Bob Brown. 

The Greens have set their sights on boosting their numbers in State Parliament to seven out of the 25 seats, being  confident that they can retain their seat in Braddon. 

Mr McKim used the launch to unveil three new policies and set targets to create 10,000 new ``high-tech jobs'' over 10 years, reduce the smoking rate in Tasmania to 15 per cent in two years and make the state the healthiest in the nation by 2030. 

To achieve the targets, the Greens have promised  a  $12 million boost for Brand Tasmania,  $13 million in preventative health, including $4.6 million to set up a a preventative health taskforce, and $6 million for disability support. 

In the party's biggest spending commitment of the campaign, the Greens vowed to build stage one of a Hobart light rail costing $100 million. 

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